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Exploring d-xylose oxidation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the Weimberg pathway

Wasserstrom, Lisa LU ; Portugal-Nunes, Diogo LU ; Almqvist, Henrik LU ; Sandström, Anders LU ; Lidén, Gunnar LU and Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F LU (2018) In AMB Express 8(1).
Abstract
Engineering of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae towards efficient d-xylose assimilation has been a major focus over the last decades since d-xylose is the second most abundant sugar in nature, and its conversion into products could significantly improve process economy in biomass-based processes. Up to now, two different metabolic routes have been introduced via genetic engineering, consisting of either the isomerization or the oxido-reduction of d-xylose to d-xylulose that is further connected to the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis. In the present study, cytosolic d-xylose oxidation was investigated instead, through the introduction of the Weimberg pathway from Caulobacter crescentus in S. cerevisiae. This pathway consists of... (More)
Engineering of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae towards efficient d-xylose assimilation has been a major focus over the last decades since d-xylose is the second most abundant sugar in nature, and its conversion into products could significantly improve process economy in biomass-based processes. Up to now, two different metabolic routes have been introduced via genetic engineering, consisting of either the isomerization or the oxido-reduction of d-xylose to d-xylulose that is further connected to the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis. In the present study, cytosolic d-xylose oxidation was investigated instead, through the introduction of the Weimberg pathway from Caulobacter crescentus in S. cerevisiae. This pathway consists of five reaction steps that connect d-xylose to the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate. The corresponding genes could be expressed in S. cerevisiae, but no growth was observed on d-xylose indicating that not all the enzymes were functionally active. The accumulation of the Weimberg intermediate d-xylonate suggested that the dehydration step(s) might be limiting, blocking further conversion into α-ketoglutarate. Although four alternative dehydratases both of bacterial and archaeon origins were evaluated, d-xylonate accumulation still occurred. A better understanding of the mechanisms associated with the activity of dehydratases, both at a bacterial and yeast level, appears essential to obtain a fully functional Weimberg pathway in S. cerevisiae. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
D-Xylose, Weimberg pathway, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, D-Xylonate dehydratase, Caulobacter crescentus, Iron–sulfur clusters
in
AMB Express
volume
8
issue
1
publisher
Springer Open
external identifiers
  • scopus:85043234829
ISSN
2191-0855
DOI
10.1186/s13568-018-0564-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a1d236db-4c47-49b3-bcf7-fb4adb4c26ab
date added to LUP
2018-03-06 09:54:32
date last changed
2018-11-21 21:38:28
@article{a1d236db-4c47-49b3-bcf7-fb4adb4c26ab,
  abstract     = {Engineering of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae towards efficient d-xylose assimilation has been a major focus over the last decades since d-xylose is the second most abundant sugar in nature, and its conversion into products could significantly improve process economy in biomass-based processes. Up to now, two different metabolic routes have been introduced via genetic engineering, consisting of either the isomerization or the oxido-reduction of d-xylose to d-xylulose that is further connected to the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis. In the present study, cytosolic d-xylose oxidation was investigated instead, through the introduction of the Weimberg pathway from Caulobacter crescentus in S. cerevisiae. This pathway consists of five reaction steps that connect d-xylose to the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate. The corresponding genes could be expressed in S. cerevisiae, but no growth was observed on d-xylose indicating that not all the enzymes were functionally active. The accumulation of the Weimberg intermediate d-xylonate suggested that the dehydration step(s) might be limiting, blocking further conversion into α-ketoglutarate. Although four alternative dehydratases both of bacterial and archaeon origins were evaluated, d-xylonate accumulation still occurred. A better understanding of the mechanisms associated with the activity of dehydratases, both at a bacterial and yeast level, appears essential to obtain a fully functional Weimberg pathway in S. cerevisiae.},
  articleno    = {8:33},
  author       = {Wasserstrom, Lisa and Portugal-Nunes, Diogo and Almqvist, Henrik and Sandström, Anders and Lidén, Gunnar and Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F},
  issn         = {2191-0855},
  keyword      = {D-Xylose,Weimberg pathway,Saccharomyces cerevisiae,D-Xylonate dehydratase,Caulobacter crescentus,Iron–sulfur clusters},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {Springer Open},
  series       = {AMB Express},
  title        = {Exploring d-xylose oxidation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the Weimberg pathway},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13568-018-0564-9},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2018},
}