Advanced

Roots and Associated Fungi Drive Long-Term Carbon Sequestration in Boreal Forest

Clemmensen, K. E.; Bahr, Adam LU ; Ovaskainen, O.; Dahlberg, A.; Ekblad, A.; Wallander, Håkan LU ; Stenlid, J.; Finlay, R. D.; Wardle, D. A. and Lindahl, B. D. (2013) In Science 339(6127). p.1615-1618
Abstract
Boreal forest soils function as a terrestrial net sink in the global carbon cycle. The prevailing dogma has focused on aboveground plant litter as a principal source of soil organic matter. Using C-14 bomb-carbon modeling, we show that 50 to 70% of stored carbon in a chronosequence of boreal forested islands derives from roots and root-associated microorganisms. Fungal biomarkers indicate impaired degradation and preservation of fungal residues in late successional forests. Furthermore, 454 pyrosequencing of molecular barcodes, in conjunction with stable isotope analyses, highlights root-associated fungi as important regulators of ecosystem carbon dynamics. Our results suggest an alternative mechanism for the accumulation of organic matter... (More)
Boreal forest soils function as a terrestrial net sink in the global carbon cycle. The prevailing dogma has focused on aboveground plant litter as a principal source of soil organic matter. Using C-14 bomb-carbon modeling, we show that 50 to 70% of stored carbon in a chronosequence of boreal forested islands derives from roots and root-associated microorganisms. Fungal biomarkers indicate impaired degradation and preservation of fungal residues in late successional forests. Furthermore, 454 pyrosequencing of molecular barcodes, in conjunction with stable isotope analyses, highlights root-associated fungi as important regulators of ecosystem carbon dynamics. Our results suggest an alternative mechanism for the accumulation of organic matter in boreal forests during succession in the long-term absence of disturbance. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Science
volume
339
issue
6127
pages
1615 - 1618
publisher
American Association for the Advancement of Science
external identifiers
  • wos:000316731600051
  • scopus:84875490014
ISSN
1095-9203
DOI
10.1126/science.1231923
project
Ectomycorrhizal fungi and nutrient mobilisation
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a1ecce16-8b03-4cfb-a3db-b21c398fd749 (old id 3749773)
date added to LUP
2013-05-20 15:22:16
date last changed
2019-10-20 03:53:26
@article{a1ecce16-8b03-4cfb-a3db-b21c398fd749,
  abstract     = {Boreal forest soils function as a terrestrial net sink in the global carbon cycle. The prevailing dogma has focused on aboveground plant litter as a principal source of soil organic matter. Using C-14 bomb-carbon modeling, we show that 50 to 70% of stored carbon in a chronosequence of boreal forested islands derives from roots and root-associated microorganisms. Fungal biomarkers indicate impaired degradation and preservation of fungal residues in late successional forests. Furthermore, 454 pyrosequencing of molecular barcodes, in conjunction with stable isotope analyses, highlights root-associated fungi as important regulators of ecosystem carbon dynamics. Our results suggest an alternative mechanism for the accumulation of organic matter in boreal forests during succession in the long-term absence of disturbance.},
  author       = {Clemmensen, K. E. and Bahr, Adam and Ovaskainen, O. and Dahlberg, A. and Ekblad, A. and Wallander, Håkan and Stenlid, J. and Finlay, R. D. and Wardle, D. A. and Lindahl, B. D.},
  issn         = {1095-9203},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6127},
  pages        = {1615--1618},
  publisher    = {American Association for the Advancement of Science},
  series       = {Science},
  title        = {Roots and Associated Fungi Drive Long-Term Carbon Sequestration in Boreal Forest},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1231923},
  volume       = {339},
  year         = {2013},
}