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Nationalism (Transcendence of)

Özkirimli, Umut LU (2016)
Abstract
The future of nations and nationalism appears to many to be more uncertain than ever in view of the growing interdependence of the planet. The question of whether globalization heralds the end of nationalism cannot be answered properly without distinguishing between nation and state. In the case of the state, the question is whether states can preserve their sovereignty intact in an age when politics is conducted at a supranational and subnational level. In the case of the nation, the question is whether there are forms of community that offer alternative foci of belonging. Even though the nation continues to be an important source of political and cultural identity, it can be argued that globalization has increased people's reflexiveness... (More)
The future of nations and nationalism appears to many to be more uncertain than ever in view of the growing interdependence of the planet. The question of whether globalization heralds the end of nationalism cannot be answered properly without distinguishing between nation and state. In the case of the state, the question is whether states can preserve their sovereignty intact in an age when politics is conducted at a supranational and subnational level. In the case of the nation, the question is whether there are forms of community that offer alternative foci of belonging. Even though the nation continues to be an important source of political and cultural identity, it can be argued that globalization has increased people's reflexiveness with regard to their identity and facilitated the emergence of new forms of belonging that are deterritorial, plural, and hybrid. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Nationalism, Globalization, Cosmopolitanism, Supranational, Transnational
host publication
The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity and Nationalism
editor
Stone, John ; Rutledge, Dennis M. ; Rizova, Polly S. and Smith, Anthony S.
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN
9781118663202
9781405189781
DOI
10.1002/9781118663202.wberen221
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a26457e6-c5fc-497b-ad9f-dc33d42a82c2
date added to LUP
2019-03-08 14:59:48
date last changed
2020-06-11 14:50:11
@inbook{a26457e6-c5fc-497b-ad9f-dc33d42a82c2,
  abstract     = {The future of nations and nationalism appears to many to be more uncertain than ever in view of the growing interdependence of the planet. The question of whether globalization heralds the end of nationalism cannot be answered properly without distinguishing between nation and state. In the case of the state, the question is whether states can preserve their sovereignty intact in an age when politics is conducted at a supranational and subnational level. In the case of the nation, the question is whether there are forms of community that offer alternative foci of belonging. Even though the nation continues to be an important source of political and cultural identity, it can be argued that globalization has increased people's reflexiveness with regard to their identity and facilitated the emergence of new forms of belonging that are deterritorial, plural, and hybrid.},
  author       = {Özkirimli, Umut},
  booktitle    = {The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity and Nationalism},
  editor       = {Stone, John and Rutledge, Dennis M. and Rizova, Polly S. and Smith, Anthony S.},
  isbn         = {9781118663202},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  title        = {Nationalism (Transcendence of)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781118663202.wberen221},
  doi          = {10.1002/9781118663202.wberen221},
  year         = {2016},
}