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Environmental systems analysis of biogas systems - Part 1: Fuel-cycle emissions

Börjesson, Pål LU and Berglund, Maria LU (2006) In BIOMASS & BIOENERGY 30(5). p.469-485
Abstract
Fuel-cycle emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) carbon oxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur dioxide (SO2), hydrocarbons (HC), methane (CH4), and particles are analysed from a life-cycle perspective for different biogas systems based oil six different raw materials. The gas is produced in large- or farm-scale biogas plants, and is used in boilers for heat production, in turbines for co-generation of heat and electricity, or as a transportation fuel in light- and heavy-duty vehicles. The analyses refer mainly to Swedish conditions. The levels of fuel-cycle emissions vary greatly among the biogas systems studied, and are significantly affected by the properties of the raw material digested, the energy efficiency of the biogas production,... (More)
Fuel-cycle emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) carbon oxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur dioxide (SO2), hydrocarbons (HC), methane (CH4), and particles are analysed from a life-cycle perspective for different biogas systems based oil six different raw materials. The gas is produced in large- or farm-scale biogas plants, and is used in boilers for heat production, in turbines for co-generation of heat and electricity, or as a transportation fuel in light- and heavy-duty vehicles. The analyses refer mainly to Swedish conditions. The levels of fuel-cycle emissions vary greatly among the biogas systems studied, and are significantly affected by the properties of the raw material digested, the energy efficiency of the biogas production, and the status of the end-use technology. For example, fuel-cycle emission may vary by a factor of 3-4, and for certain gases by up to a factor of 11, between two biogas systems that provide an equivalent energy service. Extensive handling of raw materials, e.g. ley cropping or collection of waste-products such as municipal organic waste, is often a significant source of emissions. Emission from the production phase of the biogas exceeds the end-use emissions for several biogas systems and for specific emissions. Uncontrolled losses of methane, e.g. leakages from stored digestates or from biogas upgrading, increase the fuel-cycle emissions of methane considerably. Thus, it is necessary to clearly specify the biogas production system and enduse technology being studied in order to be able to produce reliable and accurate data oil fuel-cycle emission. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
environmental systems analysis, emissions, fuel-cycle, anaerobic digestion, biogas, biogas production systems
in
BIOMASS & BIOENERGY
volume
30
issue
5
pages
469 - 485
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000237177600010
  • scopus:33645987268
ISSN
1873-2909
DOI
10.1016/j.biombioe.2005.11.014
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a7667dd6-8c15-4cdf-b47f-57e2a15c7a08 (old id 410561)
date added to LUP
2007-10-01 08:37:48
date last changed
2019-03-19 01:45:06
@article{a7667dd6-8c15-4cdf-b47f-57e2a15c7a08,
  abstract     = {Fuel-cycle emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) carbon oxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur dioxide (SO2), hydrocarbons (HC), methane (CH4), and particles are analysed from a life-cycle perspective for different biogas systems based oil six different raw materials. The gas is produced in large- or farm-scale biogas plants, and is used in boilers for heat production, in turbines for co-generation of heat and electricity, or as a transportation fuel in light- and heavy-duty vehicles. The analyses refer mainly to Swedish conditions. The levels of fuel-cycle emissions vary greatly among the biogas systems studied, and are significantly affected by the properties of the raw material digested, the energy efficiency of the biogas production, and the status of the end-use technology. For example, fuel-cycle emission may vary by a factor of 3-4, and for certain gases by up to a factor of 11, between two biogas systems that provide an equivalent energy service. Extensive handling of raw materials, e.g. ley cropping or collection of waste-products such as municipal organic waste, is often a significant source of emissions. Emission from the production phase of the biogas exceeds the end-use emissions for several biogas systems and for specific emissions. Uncontrolled losses of methane, e.g. leakages from stored digestates or from biogas upgrading, increase the fuel-cycle emissions of methane considerably. Thus, it is necessary to clearly specify the biogas production system and enduse technology being studied in order to be able to produce reliable and accurate data oil fuel-cycle emission. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Börjesson, Pål and Berglund, Maria},
  issn         = {1873-2909},
  keyword      = {environmental systems analysis,emissions,fuel-cycle,anaerobic digestion,biogas,biogas production systems},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {469--485},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {BIOMASS & BIOENERGY},
  title        = {Environmental systems analysis of biogas systems - Part 1: Fuel-cycle emissions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biombioe.2005.11.014},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2006},
}