Advanced

RapidHIT for the purpose of stain analyses - An interrupted implementation

Boiso, Samuel; Dalin, Erik LU ; Seidlitz, Heidi; Sidstedt, Maja LU ; Trygg, Elias; Hedman, Johannes LU and Ansell, Ricky (2017) In Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series 6. p.589-590
Abstract

Rapid DNA instruments have in recent years been developed, enabling analysis of forensic samples with a minimum of human intervention. Initially intended for fast handling of reference samples, such as samples from suspects in booking suites, attention shifted to include crime scene samples. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not the RapidHIT System (IntegenX) is fit for crime scene samples. The first runs gave very poor results, which was found to be due to an incorrect firmware setting leading to no or just minute amounts of amplicons being injected for electrophoresis. After solving this problem, 28 full runs (seven samples each) applying NGM SElect Express were performed comprising various amounts of blood on cotton... (More)

Rapid DNA instruments have in recent years been developed, enabling analysis of forensic samples with a minimum of human intervention. Initially intended for fast handling of reference samples, such as samples from suspects in booking suites, attention shifted to include crime scene samples. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not the RapidHIT System (IntegenX) is fit for crime scene samples. The first runs gave very poor results, which was found to be due to an incorrect firmware setting leading to no or just minute amounts of amplicons being injected for electrophoresis. After solving this problem, 28 full runs (seven samples each) applying NGM SElect Express were performed comprising various amounts of blood on cotton swabs. Six of the runs failed completely, four due to cartridge leakage and in two runs the PCR mix was not injected. For 155 samples with 1-5. μL blood (volumes for which complete DNA profiles are expected), 119 samples (77%) gave complete DNA profiles. Among the most serious failures were incorrect allele calling and leakage of DNA extract or PCR product. Other general issues were failure to export results, anode motor breakdown and broken capillary array. Due to the encountered problems with software, hardware and cartridges, together with the low success rate, it was decided not to continue towards implementation of the RapidHIT System in casework.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Automation, Forensic DNA analyses, Rapid DNA, RapidHIT System, STR
in
Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series
volume
6
pages
589 - 590
publisher
Elsevier Ireland Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85030840437
ISSN
1875-1768
DOI
10.1016/j.fsigss.2017.10.002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a80ad87f-e5a8-4eae-baf5-588890e7a587
date added to LUP
2017-11-09 15:23:33
date last changed
2018-02-18 22:22:39
@article{a80ad87f-e5a8-4eae-baf5-588890e7a587,
  abstract     = {<p>Rapid DNA instruments have in recent years been developed, enabling analysis of forensic samples with a minimum of human intervention. Initially intended for fast handling of reference samples, such as samples from suspects in booking suites, attention shifted to include crime scene samples. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not the RapidHIT System (IntegenX) is fit for crime scene samples. The first runs gave very poor results, which was found to be due to an incorrect firmware setting leading to no or just minute amounts of amplicons being injected for electrophoresis. After solving this problem, 28 full runs (seven samples each) applying NGM SElect Express were performed comprising various amounts of blood on cotton swabs. Six of the runs failed completely, four due to cartridge leakage and in two runs the PCR mix was not injected. For 155 samples with 1-5. μL blood (volumes for which complete DNA profiles are expected), 119 samples (77%) gave complete DNA profiles. Among the most serious failures were incorrect allele calling and leakage of DNA extract or PCR product. Other general issues were failure to export results, anode motor breakdown and broken capillary array. Due to the encountered problems with software, hardware and cartridges, together with the low success rate, it was decided not to continue towards implementation of the RapidHIT System in casework.</p>},
  author       = {Boiso, Samuel and Dalin, Erik and Seidlitz, Heidi and Sidstedt, Maja and Trygg, Elias and Hedman, Johannes and Ansell, Ricky},
  issn         = {1875-1768},
  keyword      = {Automation,Forensic DNA analyses,Rapid DNA,RapidHIT System,STR},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {589--590},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Ireland Ltd},
  series       = {Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series},
  title        = {RapidHIT for the purpose of stain analyses - An interrupted implementation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsigss.2017.10.002},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2017},
}