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A continuous growth model for plant tissue

Bozorg, Behruz LU ; Krupinski, Pawel LU and Jönsson, Henrik LU (2016) In Physical Biology 13(6). p.065002-065002
Abstract

Morphogenesis in plants and animals involves large irreversible deformations. In plants, the response of the cell wall material to internal and external forces is determined by its mechanical properties. An appropriate model for plant tissue growth must include key features such as anisotropic and heterogeneous elasticity and cell dependent evaluation of mechanical variables such as turgor pressure, stress and strain. In addition, a growth model needs to cope with cell divisions as a necessary part of the growth process. Here we develop such a growth model, which is capable of employing not only mechanical signals but also morphogen signals for regulating growth. The model is based on a continuous equation for updating the resting... (More)

Morphogenesis in plants and animals involves large irreversible deformations. In plants, the response of the cell wall material to internal and external forces is determined by its mechanical properties. An appropriate model for plant tissue growth must include key features such as anisotropic and heterogeneous elasticity and cell dependent evaluation of mechanical variables such as turgor pressure, stress and strain. In addition, a growth model needs to cope with cell divisions as a necessary part of the growth process. Here we develop such a growth model, which is capable of employing not only mechanical signals but also morphogen signals for regulating growth. The model is based on a continuous equation for updating the resting configuration of the tissue. Simultaneously, material properties can be updated at a different time scale. We test the stability of our model by measuring convergence of growth results for a tissue under the same mechanical and material conditions but with different spatial discretization. The model is able to maintain a strain field in the tissue during re-meshing, which is of particular importance for modeling cell division. We confirm the accuracy of our estimations in two and three-dimensional simulations, and show that residual stresses are less prominent if strain or stress is included as input signal to growth. The approach results in a model implementation that can be used to compare different growth hypotheses, while keeping residual stresses and other mechanical variables updated and available for feeding back to the growth and material properties.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Physical Biology
volume
13
issue
6
pages
065002 - 065002
publisher
IOP Publishing
external identifiers
  • scopus:85015016880
  • wos:000388713100002
ISSN
1478-3975
DOI
10.1088/1478-3975/13/6/065002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a9fe9356-08d8-4983-b596-fa7e8c368a84
date added to LUP
2016-12-06 14:52:09
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:30:20
@article{a9fe9356-08d8-4983-b596-fa7e8c368a84,
  abstract     = {<p>Morphogenesis in plants and animals involves large irreversible deformations. In plants, the response of the cell wall material to internal and external forces is determined by its mechanical properties. An appropriate model for plant tissue growth must include key features such as anisotropic and heterogeneous elasticity and cell dependent evaluation of mechanical variables such as turgor pressure, stress and strain. In addition, a growth model needs to cope with cell divisions as a necessary part of the growth process. Here we develop such a growth model, which is capable of employing not only mechanical signals but also morphogen signals for regulating growth. The model is based on a continuous equation for updating the resting configuration of the tissue. Simultaneously, material properties can be updated at a different time scale. We test the stability of our model by measuring convergence of growth results for a tissue under the same mechanical and material conditions but with different spatial discretization. The model is able to maintain a strain field in the tissue during re-meshing, which is of particular importance for modeling cell division. We confirm the accuracy of our estimations in two and three-dimensional simulations, and show that residual stresses are less prominent if strain or stress is included as input signal to growth. The approach results in a model implementation that can be used to compare different growth hypotheses, while keeping residual stresses and other mechanical variables updated and available for feeding back to the growth and material properties.</p>},
  author       = {Bozorg, Behruz and Krupinski, Pawel and Jönsson, Henrik},
  issn         = {1478-3975},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {065002--065002},
  publisher    = {IOP Publishing},
  series       = {Physical Biology},
  title        = {A continuous growth model for plant tissue},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1478-3975/13/6/065002},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2016},
}