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Post-Islamism and fields of contention after the Arab Spring : feminism, Salafism and the revolutionary youth

Holdo, Markus LU (2016) In Third World Quarterly
Abstract

In the aftermath of the Arab Spring, conflicts in Egypt and Tunisia over the authority to rule and the role of religion in society raised questions about these societies’ capacity for reconciling differences. In retrospect, the conflicts also raise questions about the theoretical tools used to analyse regional developments. In particular, the ‘post-Islamism’ thesis has significantly changed the debates on ‘Islam and democracy’ by bringing to light the changing opportunity structures, and changed goals, of Islamist movements. However, this paper argues that the theory underestimates differences within post-Islamist societies. Drawing on field theory, the paper shows how the actual content of post-Islamism is contingent on political... (More)

In the aftermath of the Arab Spring, conflicts in Egypt and Tunisia over the authority to rule and the role of religion in society raised questions about these societies’ capacity for reconciling differences. In retrospect, the conflicts also raise questions about the theoretical tools used to analyse regional developments. In particular, the ‘post-Islamism’ thesis has significantly changed the debates on ‘Islam and democracy’ by bringing to light the changing opportunity structures, and changed goals, of Islamist movements. However, this paper argues that the theory underestimates differences within post-Islamist societies. Drawing on field theory, the paper shows how the actual content of post-Islamism is contingent on political struggle. It focuses on three fields whose political roles have been underestimated or misrepresented by post-Islamist theorists: Islamic feminism, Salafist-jihadism and the revolutionary youth. Their respective forms of capital – sources of legitimacy and social recognition – give important clues for understanding the stakes of the conflicts after the Arab Spring.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Arab Spring, Egypt, gender and feminism, post-Islamism, Salafism, Tunisia
in
Third World Quarterly
pages
16 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:84991035930
  • wos:000404932400007
ISSN
0143-6597
DOI
10.1080/01436597.2016.1233492
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aa0a220a-aaa6-4b35-b882-1eef36eacb58
date added to LUP
2016-10-31 10:30:35
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:28:45
@article{aa0a220a-aaa6-4b35-b882-1eef36eacb58,
  abstract     = {<p>In the aftermath of the Arab Spring, conflicts in Egypt and Tunisia over the authority to rule and the role of religion in society raised questions about these societies’ capacity for reconciling differences. In retrospect, the conflicts also raise questions about the theoretical tools used to analyse regional developments. In particular, the ‘post-Islamism’ thesis has significantly changed the debates on ‘Islam and democracy’ by bringing to light the changing opportunity structures, and changed goals, of Islamist movements. However, this paper argues that the theory underestimates differences within post-Islamist societies. Drawing on field theory, the paper shows how the actual content of post-Islamism is contingent on political struggle. It focuses on three fields whose political roles have been underestimated or misrepresented by post-Islamist theorists: Islamic feminism, Salafist-jihadism and the revolutionary youth. Their respective forms of capital – sources of legitimacy and social recognition – give important clues for understanding the stakes of the conflicts after the Arab Spring.</p>},
  author       = {Holdo, Markus},
  issn         = {0143-6597},
  keyword      = {Arab Spring,Egypt,gender and feminism,post-Islamism,Salafism,Tunisia},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  pages        = {16},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Third World Quarterly},
  title        = {Post-Islamism and fields of contention after the Arab Spring : feminism, Salafism and the revolutionary youth},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01436597.2016.1233492},
  year         = {2016},
}