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Review shows that donor milk does not promote the growth and development of preterm infants as well as maternal milk

Hård, Anna Lena; Nilsson, Anders K.; Lund, Anna My LU ; Hansen-Pupp, Ingrid LU ; Smith, Lois E.H. and Hellström, Ann LU (2019) In Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics 108(6). p.998-1007
Abstract

Aim: This nonsystematic review examined differences in the composition of raw maternal breastmilk and pasteurised donor milk and possible health effects on preterm infants. Methods: We searched PubMed up to July 2018 for studies published in English that focused on four comparisons as follows: raw maternal milk versus donor milk, human milk before and after Holder pasteurisation, milk from mothers who delivered preterm and at term and milk collected during early and late lactation. We also searched for possible effects of the milk components, as well as the effects of maternal and donor milk on preterm infants’ health. Results: Raw maternal milk contained factors involved in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defence, gut microbiome... (More)

Aim: This nonsystematic review examined differences in the composition of raw maternal breastmilk and pasteurised donor milk and possible health effects on preterm infants. Methods: We searched PubMed up to July 2018 for studies published in English that focused on four comparisons as follows: raw maternal milk versus donor milk, human milk before and after Holder pasteurisation, milk from mothers who delivered preterm and at term and milk collected during early and late lactation. We also searched for possible effects of the milk components, as well as the effects of maternal and donor milk on preterm infants’ health. Results: Raw maternal milk contained factors involved in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defence, gut microbiome establishment and the maturation of immune defences, food tolerability and metabolism. Many of these factors were reduced or abolished in processed donor milk. Both maternal milk and donor milk have been associated with a reduced incidence of necrotising enterocolitis. High-dose feeding with maternal milk during the neonatal period reportedly reduced the risk of other morbidities and promoted growth and neurodevelopment. Conclusion: Many of the components in raw maternal breastmilk were lacking in pasteurised donor milk, which was inferior in promoting the growth and development of very preterm infants.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Donor milk, Maternal milk, Morbidity, Pasteurisation, Preterm
in
Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
volume
108
issue
6
pages
998 - 1007
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85060567021
ISSN
0803-5253
DOI
10.1111/apa.14702
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aa0be1b2-f317-4068-b5f7-5395073815b4
date added to LUP
2019-02-07 08:10:02
date last changed
2019-10-08 03:46:04
@article{aa0be1b2-f317-4068-b5f7-5395073815b4,
  abstract     = {<p>Aim: This nonsystematic review examined differences in the composition of raw maternal breastmilk and pasteurised donor milk and possible health effects on preterm infants. Methods: We searched PubMed up to July 2018 for studies published in English that focused on four comparisons as follows: raw maternal milk versus donor milk, human milk before and after Holder pasteurisation, milk from mothers who delivered preterm and at term and milk collected during early and late lactation. We also searched for possible effects of the milk components, as well as the effects of maternal and donor milk on preterm infants’ health. Results: Raw maternal milk contained factors involved in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defence, gut microbiome establishment and the maturation of immune defences, food tolerability and metabolism. Many of these factors were reduced or abolished in processed donor milk. Both maternal milk and donor milk have been associated with a reduced incidence of necrotising enterocolitis. High-dose feeding with maternal milk during the neonatal period reportedly reduced the risk of other morbidities and promoted growth and neurodevelopment. Conclusion: Many of the components in raw maternal breastmilk were lacking in pasteurised donor milk, which was inferior in promoting the growth and development of very preterm infants.</p>},
  author       = {Hård, Anna Lena and Nilsson, Anders K. and Lund, Anna My and Hansen-Pupp, Ingrid and Smith, Lois E.H. and Hellström, Ann},
  issn         = {0803-5253},
  keyword      = {Donor milk,Maternal milk,Morbidity,Pasteurisation,Preterm},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {998--1007},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics},
  title        = {Review shows that donor milk does not promote the growth and development of preterm infants as well as maternal milk},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.14702},
  volume       = {108},
  year         = {2019},
}