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Russia on display. Sochi-2014 as a project of belonging in contemporary media

Edenborg, Emil LU (2013) In Zhurnal Sotsiolog II i Sotsialnoi Antropologii 70(5). p.221-234
Abstract
Mediated mega-events are essentially projects of belonging: about imagining communities and about creating attachment to such collective selves. However, events like the Olympic Games are not only an opportunity for states to reinforce official constructions of belonging but can also be sites for the articulation and dissemination of contesting identity narratives. This article investigates Russian media narratives around the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, mainstream as well as alternative. It is argued that the Russian regime uses the Olympics to create national and global visibility for a specific project of belonging: that of a re-emerging great power — strong and united — but also an inclusive and tolerant place which can serve as an... (More)
Mediated mega-events are essentially projects of belonging: about imagining communities and about creating attachment to such collective selves. However, events like the Olympic Games are not only an opportunity for states to reinforce official constructions of belonging but can also be sites for the articulation and dissemination of contesting identity narratives. This article investigates Russian media narratives around the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, mainstream as well as alternative. It is argued that the Russian regime uses the Olympics to create national and global visibility for a specific project of belonging: that of a re-emerging great power — strong and united — but also an inclusive and tolerant place which can serve as an international example of ethnic and religious conviviality. This imagined community, however, rests on exclusions and silences. In addition, three alternative projects of belonging, emerging from the Circassian diaspora, LGBT rights activists and Islamists, are examined. Although these are very different, they all attempt to use the spotlight of the Sochi Olympics to disrupt the mainstream narrative and create visibility for challenging imaginations of community. On the more general level the article argues that the media contestations around the Sochi Olympics provide an insight into how the quest for visibility has become a central dynamic in the Russian media environment. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Olympic games, Sochi, media, belonging, visibility
in
Zhurnal Sotsiolog II i Sotsialnoi Antropologii
volume
70
issue
5
pages
221 - 234
publisher
Izd-vo Sankt-Peterburgskogo universiteta
ISSN
1029-8053
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aa2723e4-c0f5-4e5e-858e-672332fe5fa8 (old id 4935199)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 10:42:26
date last changed
2018-11-21 19:49:53
@article{aa2723e4-c0f5-4e5e-858e-672332fe5fa8,
  abstract     = {Mediated mega-events are essentially projects of belonging: about imagining communities and about creating attachment to such collective selves. However, events like the Olympic Games are not only an opportunity for states to reinforce official constructions of belonging but can also be sites for the articulation and dissemination of contesting identity narratives. This article investigates Russian media narratives around the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, mainstream as well as alternative. It is argued that the Russian regime uses the Olympics to create national and global visibility for a specific project of belonging: that of a re-emerging great power — strong and united — but also an inclusive and tolerant place which can serve as an international example of ethnic and religious conviviality. This imagined community, however, rests on exclusions and silences. In addition, three alternative projects of belonging, emerging from the Circassian diaspora, LGBT rights activists and Islamists, are examined. Although these are very different, they all attempt to use the spotlight of the Sochi Olympics to disrupt the mainstream narrative and create visibility for challenging imaginations of community. On the more general level the article argues that the media contestations around the Sochi Olympics provide an insight into how the quest for visibility has become a central dynamic in the Russian media environment.},
  author       = {Edenborg, Emil},
  issn         = {1029-8053},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {221--234},
  publisher    = {Izd-vo Sankt-Peterburgskogo universiteta},
  series       = {Zhurnal Sotsiolog II i Sotsialnoi Antropologii},
  title        = {Russia on display. Sochi-2014 as a project of belonging in contemporary media},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/2069047/4935206.pdf},
  volume       = {70},
  year         = {2013},
}