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The core of social functioning after solid organ transplantation

Forsberg, Anna LU ; Cavallini, Josefine ; Fridh, Isabell and Lennerling, Annette (2016) In Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences 30(3). p.458-465
Abstract
Background
Social function is a key aspect of health‐related quality of life after solid organ transplantation (SOT). The focus of this study was to report how solid organ‐transplanted patients change their social function after transplantation.
Aim
To investigate the main concerns associated with social function after SOT and how solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) deal with these concerns.
Method
Twenty SOTRs, 13 men and 7 women, with a mean age of 54 years (range 22–75 years) and due for their first‐year follow‐up were included in this study. The informants had received various types of solid organs. Data were collected through in‐depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by... (More)
Background
Social function is a key aspect of health‐related quality of life after solid organ transplantation (SOT). The focus of this study was to report how solid organ‐transplanted patients change their social function after transplantation.
Aim
To investigate the main concerns associated with social function after SOT and how solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) deal with these concerns.
Method
Twenty SOTRs, 13 men and 7 women, with a mean age of 54 years (range 22–75 years) and due for their first‐year follow‐up were included in this study. The informants had received various types of solid organs. Data were collected through in‐depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the method of grounded theory (GT) developed by Charmaz.
Result
The GT of this study describes the efforts by the 20 SOTRs to adapt socially in order to maintain their social functioning and leading a normal life. The efforts summaries a process wherein the generated GT is present through three main categories: deconstruction, restriction and reconstruction, showing various ways to socially adapt. Through this process, a clear path of transition through adaptation is evident, starting before transplantation and continues beyond the first year after transplantation.
Conclusion
Social functions improved through a process of adaptation during the first year after transplantation. Working and travelling were the two most important aspects of social function. All the informants emphasised the importance of regaining a normal life, which was the outcome of a successful adaptation.
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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
volume
30
issue
3
pages
458 - 465
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:26395270
  • pmid:26395270
  • wos:000383803300004
  • scopus:85027929301
ISSN
1471-6712
DOI
10.1111/scs.12264
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ab43361b-eb4b-431a-b833-6df79ec9178d (old id 8035298)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26395270?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-04 09:23:38
date last changed
2020-02-12 07:50:58
@article{ab43361b-eb4b-431a-b833-6df79ec9178d,
  abstract     = {Background<br/>Social function is a key aspect of health‐related quality of life after solid organ transplantation (SOT). The focus of this study was to report how solid organ‐transplanted patients change their social function after transplantation.<br/>Aim<br/>To investigate the main concerns associated with social function after SOT and how solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) deal with these concerns.<br/>Method<br/>Twenty SOTRs, 13 men and 7 women, with a mean age of 54 years (range 22–75 years) and due for their first‐year follow‐up were included in this study. The informants had received various types of solid organs. Data were collected through in‐depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the method of grounded theory (GT) developed by Charmaz.<br/>Result<br/>The GT of this study describes the efforts by the 20 SOTRs to adapt socially in order to maintain their social functioning and leading a normal life. The efforts summaries a process wherein the generated GT is present through three main categories: deconstruction, restriction and reconstruction, showing various ways to socially adapt. Through this process, a clear path of transition through adaptation is evident, starting before transplantation and continues beyond the first year after transplantation.<br/>Conclusion<br/>Social functions improved through a process of adaptation during the first year after transplantation. Working and travelling were the two most important aspects of social function. All the informants emphasised the importance of regaining a normal life, which was the outcome of a successful adaptation.<br/>},
  author       = {Forsberg, Anna and Cavallini, Josefine and Fridh, Isabell and Lennerling, Annette},
  issn         = {1471-6712},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {458--465},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences},
  title        = {The core of social functioning after solid organ transplantation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/scs.12264},
  doi          = {10.1111/scs.12264},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2016},
}