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Impacts of Anthropogenic Land Use Changes on Nutrient Concentrations in Surface Waterbodies : A Review

Delkash, Madjid; Al-Faraj, Furat A.M. and Scholz, Miklas LU (2018) In Clean - Soil, Air, Water
Abstract

Increased population leads to land use (LU) changes from natural to urban and agricultural LU. These disturbances not only decrease the natural treatment potential but they also worsen surface water quality (SWQ). The aim of this review is to assess studies about impacts of anthropogenic LU changes on levels of nutrient concentrations in surface waterbodies, highlighting the important parameters needed for an integrated simulation. The results reported in the literature are not always fully consistent. These contradictory results can sometimes be explained by field measurements under different climatic conditions, different features of landscapes, air deposition rates on ground surfaces, and groundwater flow interactions with surface... (More)

Increased population leads to land use (LU) changes from natural to urban and agricultural LU. These disturbances not only decrease the natural treatment potential but they also worsen surface water quality (SWQ). The aim of this review is to assess studies about impacts of anthropogenic LU changes on levels of nutrient concentrations in surface waterbodies, highlighting the important parameters needed for an integrated simulation. The results reported in the literature are not always fully consistent. These contradictory results can sometimes be explained by field measurements under different climatic conditions, different features of landscapes, air deposition rates on ground surfaces, and groundwater flow interactions with surface water. Integrated modelling has been suggested to overcome these inconsistencies. Physical-based and empirical models are the most popular approaches for LU-SWQ studies. Generally, anthropogenic LU such as agricultural and urban areas usually enhances nutrient concentrations much more than natural lands such as forest and barren. Developing sustainable metropolitan areas instead of rural areas, establishing high-standard wastewater treatment plants, and practicing efficient fertiliser application would ameliorate the poor nutrient conditions in SWQ. Riparian vegetation, grassed swales, and construction of artificial wetlands as buffer zones are the most promising natural water quality control measures.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Anthropogenic land use planning, Best management practices, Fertilizer, Nitrogen, Surface water modelling
in
Clean - Soil, Air, Water
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85042378727
ISSN
1863-0650
DOI
10.1002/clen.201800051
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ab84efc4-aaa1-4c5e-9856-36534026f0af
date added to LUP
2018-03-07 12:46:26
date last changed
2018-06-24 05:20:59
@article{ab84efc4-aaa1-4c5e-9856-36534026f0af,
  abstract     = {<p>Increased population leads to land use (LU) changes from natural to urban and agricultural LU. These disturbances not only decrease the natural treatment potential but they also worsen surface water quality (SWQ). The aim of this review is to assess studies about impacts of anthropogenic LU changes on levels of nutrient concentrations in surface waterbodies, highlighting the important parameters needed for an integrated simulation. The results reported in the literature are not always fully consistent. These contradictory results can sometimes be explained by field measurements under different climatic conditions, different features of landscapes, air deposition rates on ground surfaces, and groundwater flow interactions with surface water. Integrated modelling has been suggested to overcome these inconsistencies. Physical-based and empirical models are the most popular approaches for LU-SWQ studies. Generally, anthropogenic LU such as agricultural and urban areas usually enhances nutrient concentrations much more than natural lands such as forest and barren. Developing sustainable metropolitan areas instead of rural areas, establishing high-standard wastewater treatment plants, and practicing efficient fertiliser application would ameliorate the poor nutrient conditions in SWQ. Riparian vegetation, grassed swales, and construction of artificial wetlands as buffer zones are the most promising natural water quality control measures.</p>},
  author       = {Delkash, Madjid and Al-Faraj, Furat A.M. and Scholz, Miklas},
  issn         = {1863-0650},
  keyword      = {Anthropogenic land use planning,Best management practices,Fertilizer,Nitrogen,Surface water modelling},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Clean - Soil, Air, Water},
  title        = {Impacts of Anthropogenic Land Use Changes on Nutrient Concentrations in Surface Waterbodies : A Review},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/clen.201800051},
  year         = {2018},
}