Advanced

Induced polarization applied to biogeophysics: recent advances and future prospects

Kessouri, Pauline ; Furman, Alexander ; Huisman, Johan Alexander ; Martin, Tina LU ; Mellage, Adrian ; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios ; Bücker, Matthias and al, et (2019) In Near Surface Geophysics
Abstract
This paper provides an update on the fast-evolving topic of the induced polarization (IP) method applied to biogeophysics. It emphasizes new understandings of the IP phenomena associated with biological activity, pointing out new developments and applications, and identifying existing knowledge gaps. The focus is on the use of IP as related to living organisms, including micro-organisms and plants (both roots and stems). We first discuss observed links between the IP signal and microbial cell structure, activity and biofilm formation. We provide an up-to-date conceptual model of the electrical behavior of the microbial cell and biofilm and examine the role of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms on the functionality and development... (More)
This paper provides an update on the fast-evolving topic of the induced polarization (IP) method applied to biogeophysics. It emphasizes new understandings of the IP phenomena associated with biological activity, pointing out new developments and applications, and identifying existing knowledge gaps. The focus is on the use of IP as related to living organisms, including micro-organisms and plants (both roots and stems). We first discuss observed links between the IP signal and microbial cell structure, activity and biofilm formation. We provide an up-to-date conceptual model of the electrical behavior of the microbial cell and biofilm and examine the role of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms on the functionality and development of biofilms. We review the latest biogeophysical studies, including work on hydrocarbon biodegradation, contaminant sequestration, soil strengthening and peatland characterization. We then elaborate on the IP signature of the plant root zone, relying on a state-of-the-art conceptual model of the biogeophysical mechanisms of a plant root cell. The first laboratory surveys show that single roots and root system are highly polarizable. They also present encouraging results for imaging the root system embeded in a medium and gaining information on the mass density, the structure or the physiological characteristics of the root system. IP is also used to characterize wood and tree structures in the lab but also at the field scale, through tomography of the stem. Finally, we discuss up- and down-scaling between lab and field studies as well as joint interpretation. We emphasize the need for intermediate scale studies and the benefits of using IP as a time-lapse monitoring method. We conclude with the promising integration of IP in global mechanistic models to better understand and quantify subsurface biogeochemical processes. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
in press
subject
in
Near Surface Geophysics
publisher
EAGE
ISSN
1873-0604
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ae60e2eb-37eb-4830-a1bf-2e71da3f8a83
date added to LUP
2019-06-03 08:52:57
date last changed
2019-09-26 14:26:56
@article{ae60e2eb-37eb-4830-a1bf-2e71da3f8a83,
  abstract     = {This paper provides an update on the fast-evolving topic of the induced polarization (IP) method applied to biogeophysics. It emphasizes new understandings of the IP phenomena associated with biological activity, pointing out new developments and applications, and identifying existing knowledge gaps. The focus is on the use of IP as related to living organisms, including micro-organisms and plants (both roots and stems). We first discuss observed links between the IP signal and microbial cell structure, activity and biofilm formation. We provide an up-to-date conceptual model of the electrical behavior of the microbial cell and biofilm and examine the role of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms on the functionality and development of biofilms. We review the latest biogeophysical studies, including work on hydrocarbon biodegradation, contaminant sequestration, soil strengthening and peatland characterization. We then elaborate on the IP signature of the plant root zone, relying on a state-of-the-art conceptual model of the biogeophysical mechanisms of a plant root cell. The first laboratory surveys show that single roots and root system are highly polarizable. They also present encouraging results for imaging the root system embeded in a medium and gaining information on the mass density, the structure or the physiological characteristics of the root system. IP is also used to characterize wood and tree structures in the lab but also at the field scale, through tomography of the stem. Finally, we discuss up- and down-scaling between lab and field studies as well as joint interpretation. We emphasize the need for intermediate scale studies and the benefits of using IP as a time-lapse monitoring method. We conclude with the promising integration of IP in global mechanistic models to better understand and quantify subsurface biogeochemical processes.},
  author       = {Kessouri, Pauline and Furman, Alexander and Huisman, Johan Alexander and Martin, Tina and Mellage, Adrian and Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios and Bücker, Matthias and al, et},
  issn         = {1873-0604},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {EAGE},
  series       = {Near Surface Geophysics},
  title        = {Induced polarization applied to biogeophysics: recent advances and future prospects},
  year         = {2019},
}