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Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase in rhesus monkey spinal cord

Lindqvist, Niclas LU ; Scherberger, H and Zhang, Mengliang LU (2015) Society for Neuroscience: 45th Annual Meeting
Abstract
Spasticity is a locomotory disability that is common after injury to the spinal cord. Monoamines such as serotonin and dopamine controls the activation of motoneurons, which in turn affects muscle. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) catalyzes formation of serotonin from 5-hydroxytryptophan and dopamine from L-dihydroxyphenylalanine. To study if there are cells in the primate spinal cord that express AADC and thereby may produce monoamines, we performed immunohistochemistry with diaminobenzidine staining on normal spinal cord from Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). Transversal sections revealed AADC-immunoreactive (IR) cells close to the central canal (CC) with processes passing the ependymal layer into the CC where they terminated... (More)
Spasticity is a locomotory disability that is common after injury to the spinal cord. Monoamines such as serotonin and dopamine controls the activation of motoneurons, which in turn affects muscle. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) catalyzes formation of serotonin from 5-hydroxytryptophan and dopamine from L-dihydroxyphenylalanine. To study if there are cells in the primate spinal cord that express AADC and thereby may produce monoamines, we performed immunohistochemistry with diaminobenzidine staining on normal spinal cord from Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). Transversal sections revealed AADC-immunoreactive (IR) cells close to the central canal (CC) with processes passing the ependymal layer into the CC where they terminated with a bulbous ending. These AADC-IR cells were mainly found on the ventral side of CC with strongly stained cell bodies and processes whereas occasional bulbous endings immunostained for AADC were found on the dorsal side of CC. These AADC-IR cells were clearly cerebrospinal-fluid contacting and classified as belonging to the D1 category of AADC-cells. They were found in cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal cord segments. In addition, AADC-IR cells with clearly labeled processes were found around and ventral of CC towards the ventral median fissure. These cells were sometimes situated close to blood vessels. Thus, AADC-IR cells were mainly found in gray matter and in gray matter bordering the white matter. Vascular walls were not clearly immunostained for AADC. Strong AADC-IR was seen in fibers, particularly in the dorsal horns and these were potentially descending monoamine fibers from the brain. In comparison with rat spinal cord (1) the AADC-IR cells in monkey spinal cord were overall less abundant. In conclusion, we have identified AADC-IR cells in monkey spinal cord and further studies will reveal if they may contribute to monoamine synthesis and control of motoneuron excitability after spinal cord injury. (1) Wienecke et al, J Neurosci, 34:36, 2014 (Less)
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@misc{aeb6f1d3-ac27-460f-8b9d-36eaeb106b74,
  abstract     = {Spasticity is a locomotory disability that is common after injury to the spinal cord. Monoamines such as serotonin and dopamine controls the activation of motoneurons, which in turn affects muscle. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) catalyzes formation of serotonin from 5-hydroxytryptophan and dopamine from L-dihydroxyphenylalanine. To study if there are cells in the primate spinal cord that express AADC and thereby may produce monoamines, we performed immunohistochemistry with diaminobenzidine staining on normal spinal cord from Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). Transversal sections revealed AADC-immunoreactive (IR) cells close to the central canal (CC) with processes passing the ependymal layer into the CC where they terminated with a bulbous ending. These AADC-IR cells were mainly found on the ventral side of CC with strongly stained cell bodies and processes whereas occasional bulbous endings immunostained for AADC were found on the dorsal side of CC. These AADC-IR cells were clearly cerebrospinal-fluid contacting and classified as belonging to the D1 category of AADC-cells. They were found in cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal cord segments. In addition, AADC-IR cells with clearly labeled processes were found around and ventral of CC towards the ventral median fissure. These cells were sometimes situated close to blood vessels. Thus, AADC-IR cells were mainly found in gray matter and in gray matter bordering the white matter. Vascular walls were not clearly immunostained for AADC. Strong AADC-IR was seen in fibers, particularly in the dorsal horns and these were potentially descending monoamine fibers from the brain. In comparison with rat spinal cord (1) the AADC-IR cells in monkey spinal cord were overall less abundant. In conclusion, we have identified AADC-IR cells in monkey spinal cord and further studies will reveal if they may contribute to monoamine synthesis and control of motoneuron excitability after spinal cord injury. (1) Wienecke et al, J Neurosci, 34:36, 2014},
  author       = {Lindqvist, Niclas and Scherberger, H and Zhang, Mengliang},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase in rhesus monkey spinal cord},
  year         = {2015},
}