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Heparin-binding protein : A key player in the pathophysiology of organ dysfunction in sepsis

Fisher, J. LU and Linder, A. LU (2017) In Journal of Internal Medicine p.1-13
Abstract

Infectious diseases remain a major health problem, and sepsis and other severe infectious diseases are common causes of morbidity and mortality. There is a need for clinical and laboratory tools to identify patients with severe infections early and to distinguish between bacterial and nonbacterial conditions. Heparin-binding protein (HBP), also known as azurocidin or cationic antimicrobial protein of 37 KDa, is a promising biomarker to distinguish between patients with these conditions. It is biologically plausible that HBP is an early and predictive biomarker because it is prefabricated and rapidly mobilized from migrating neutrophils in response to bacterial infections. HBP induces vascular leakage and oedema formation and has a... (More)

Infectious diseases remain a major health problem, and sepsis and other severe infectious diseases are common causes of morbidity and mortality. There is a need for clinical and laboratory tools to identify patients with severe infections early and to distinguish between bacterial and nonbacterial conditions. Heparin-binding protein (HBP), also known as azurocidin or cationic antimicrobial protein of 37 KDa, is a promising biomarker to distinguish between patients with these conditions. It is biologically plausible that HBP is an early and predictive biomarker because it is prefabricated and rapidly mobilized from migrating neutrophils in response to bacterial infections. HBP induces vascular leakage and oedema formation and has a pro-inflammatory effect on a variety of white blood cells and epithelial cells. The dysregulation of vascular barrier function and cellular inflammatory responses can then lead to organ dysfunction. Indeed, it has been shown that patients with sepsis express elevated levels of HBP in plasma several hours before they develop hypotension or organ dysfunction. HBP has a major role in the pathophysiology of severe bacterial infections and thus represents a potential diagnostic marker and a target for the treatment of sepsis.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Biomarkers, Heparin-binding protein (HBP), Sepsis
in
Journal of Internal Medicine
pages
1 - 13
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85017404259
  • wos:000401715800003
ISSN
0954-6820
DOI
10.1111/joim.12604
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aedd792a-0715-4514-8f3a-f5b8e63fcf6e
date added to LUP
2017-05-05 11:27:30
date last changed
2017-09-18 13:34:11
@article{aedd792a-0715-4514-8f3a-f5b8e63fcf6e,
  abstract     = {<p>Infectious diseases remain a major health problem, and sepsis and other severe infectious diseases are common causes of morbidity and mortality. There is a need for clinical and laboratory tools to identify patients with severe infections early and to distinguish between bacterial and nonbacterial conditions. Heparin-binding protein (HBP), also known as azurocidin or cationic antimicrobial protein of 37 KDa, is a promising biomarker to distinguish between patients with these conditions. It is biologically plausible that HBP is an early and predictive biomarker because it is prefabricated and rapidly mobilized from migrating neutrophils in response to bacterial infections. HBP induces vascular leakage and oedema formation and has a pro-inflammatory effect on a variety of white blood cells and epithelial cells. The dysregulation of vascular barrier function and cellular inflammatory responses can then lead to organ dysfunction. Indeed, it has been shown that patients with sepsis express elevated levels of HBP in plasma several hours before they develop hypotension or organ dysfunction. HBP has a major role in the pathophysiology of severe bacterial infections and thus represents a potential diagnostic marker and a target for the treatment of sepsis.</p>},
  author       = {Fisher, J. and Linder, A.},
  issn         = {0954-6820},
  keyword      = {Biomarkers,Heparin-binding protein (HBP),Sepsis},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--13},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Internal Medicine},
  title        = {Heparin-binding protein : A key player in the pathophysiology of organ dysfunction in sepsis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joim.12604},
  year         = {2017},
}