Advanced

Short article : Presence, extent and location of pancreatic necrosis are independent of aetiology in acute pancreatitis

Verdonk, Robert C.; Sternby, Hanna LU ; Dimova, Alexandra; Ignatavicius, Povilas; Koiva, Peter; Penttila, Anne K.; Ilzarbe, Lucas; Regner, Sara LU ; Rosendahl, Jonas and Bollen, Thomas L. (2018) In European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 30(3). p.342-345
Abstract

Objective The most common aetiologies of acute pancreatitis (AP) are gallstones, alcohol and idiopathic. The impact of the aetiology of AP on the extent and morphology of pancreatic and extrapancreatic necrosis (EXPN) has not been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of aetiology on the presence and location of pancreatic necrosis in patients with AP. Patients and methods We carried out a post-hoc analysis of a previously established multicentre cohort of patients with AP in whom a computed tomography was available for review. Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. All computed tomographies were revised by the same expert radiologist. The impact of aetiology on pancreatic and EXPN... (More)

Objective The most common aetiologies of acute pancreatitis (AP) are gallstones, alcohol and idiopathic. The impact of the aetiology of AP on the extent and morphology of pancreatic and extrapancreatic necrosis (EXPN) has not been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of aetiology on the presence and location of pancreatic necrosis in patients with AP. Patients and methods We carried out a post-hoc analysis of a previously established multicentre cohort of patients with AP in whom a computed tomography was available for review. Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. All computed tomographies were revised by the same expert radiologist. The impact of aetiology on pancreatic and EXPN was calculated. Results In total, 159 patients with necrotizing pancreatitis were identified from a cohort of 285 patients. The most frequent aetiologies were biliary (105 patients, 37%), followed by alcohol (102 patients, 36%) and other aetiologies including idiopathic (78 patients, 27%). No relationship was found between the aetiology and the presence of pancreatic necrosis, EXPN, location of pancreatic necrosis or presence of collections. Conclusion We found no association between the aetiology of AP and the presence, extent and anatomical location of pancreatic necrosis.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
acute pancreatitis, alcohol, gallstones, necrosis
in
European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
volume
30
issue
3
pages
4 pages
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • scopus:85042367183
ISSN
0954-691X
DOI
10.1097/MEG.0000000000001053
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
af8ba891-0acf-48b5-87f1-a933bbf30cb3
date added to LUP
2018-03-08 13:58:12
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:23:16
@article{af8ba891-0acf-48b5-87f1-a933bbf30cb3,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective The most common aetiologies of acute pancreatitis (AP) are gallstones, alcohol and idiopathic. The impact of the aetiology of AP on the extent and morphology of pancreatic and extrapancreatic necrosis (EXPN) has not been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of aetiology on the presence and location of pancreatic necrosis in patients with AP. Patients and methods We carried out a post-hoc analysis of a previously established multicentre cohort of patients with AP in whom a computed tomography was available for review. Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. All computed tomographies were revised by the same expert radiologist. The impact of aetiology on pancreatic and EXPN was calculated. Results In total, 159 patients with necrotizing pancreatitis were identified from a cohort of 285 patients. The most frequent aetiologies were biliary (105 patients, 37%), followed by alcohol (102 patients, 36%) and other aetiologies including idiopathic (78 patients, 27%). No relationship was found between the aetiology and the presence of pancreatic necrosis, EXPN, location of pancreatic necrosis or presence of collections. Conclusion We found no association between the aetiology of AP and the presence, extent and anatomical location of pancreatic necrosis.</p>},
  author       = {Verdonk, Robert C. and Sternby, Hanna and Dimova, Alexandra and Ignatavicius, Povilas and Koiva, Peter and Penttila, Anne K. and Ilzarbe, Lucas and Regner, Sara and Rosendahl, Jonas and Bollen, Thomas L.},
  issn         = {0954-691X},
  keyword      = {acute pancreatitis,alcohol,gallstones,necrosis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {342--345},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology},
  title        = {Short article : Presence, extent and location of pancreatic necrosis are independent of aetiology in acute pancreatitis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MEG.0000000000001053},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2018},
}