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Joint effects of genes, body constitution, and lifestyle: exploring novel pathways to predict prognosis and response to therapy in breast cancer

Jernström, Helena LU (2014) The ninth International Conference of Anticancer Research, 6–10 October 2014, Sithonia, Greece In Anticancer research 34(10). p.5974-5975
Abstract
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the Western world. In Sweden, 1 in 9 women will be diagnosed during their lifetime, amounting to >8,000 new breast cancers per year. Each year around 1,400 patients die from their disease. A comprehensive report entitled "highlighted several areas in need of more research", including how weight, alcohol consumption, smoking, host metabolism and inflammatory and immunological factors’ impact on cancer progression (1). Our group has assembled a populationbased cohort of primary breast cancer patients in Lund, Sweden since 2002. Our analyses have shown significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) for breast cancer patients with ER-positive tumors and large total breast volume... (More)
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the Western world. In Sweden, 1 in 9 women will be diagnosed during their lifetime, amounting to >8,000 new breast cancers per year. Each year around 1,400 patients die from their disease. A comprehensive report entitled "highlighted several areas in need of more research", including how weight, alcohol consumption, smoking, host metabolism and inflammatory and immunological factors’ impact on cancer progression (1). Our group has assembled a populationbased cohort of primary breast cancer patients in Lund, Sweden since 2002. Our analyses have shown significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) for breast cancer patients with ER-positive tumors and large total breast volume (≥850 ml) regardless of age, WHR and BMI (2). Preoperative BMI was not significantly associated with DFS after postoperative weight change was taken into account. The response to endocrine therapy was associated with germline genotypes of the androgen receptor (3) and COX2 (4), while tamoxifen response was not associated with CYP2D6 genotypes (5). Instead, coffee intake was associated with significantly better response to tamoxifen treatment with less than half the risk of early breast cancer events in patients who consumed 2+ cups/day compared to 0-1 cups/day (6). This was not observed in patients treated with aromatase inhibitors. Further, a low to moderate alcohol intake was associated with significantly longer DFS but only in patients with node-positive disease (7). This may, in part, be mediated by the fact that patients with two out of the three clinical markers “low alcohol intake, current smoking and normal BMI” were significantly less likely to adhere to their endocrine treatment (8).Taken together, our data suggest that body constitution, lifestyle and genetic factors jointly impact on the prognosis and treatment response in breast cancer, stressing the importance of taking host factors into consideration. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Anticancer research
volume
34
issue
10
article number
291
pages
5974 - 5975
publisher
International Institute of Cancer Research
conference name
The ninth International Conference of Anticancer Research, 6–10 October 2014, Sithonia, Greece
conference location
Sithonia, Greece
conference dates
2014-10-06 - 2019-05-10
ISSN
1791-7530
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b32536e6-84e8-4688-b54c-0ed984eb3db7
alternative location
http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/34/10/5761.full.pdf+html
date added to LUP
2019-05-22 10:53:19
date last changed
2020-01-28 13:27:33
@misc{b32536e6-84e8-4688-b54c-0ed984eb3db7,
  abstract     = {Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the Western world. In Sweden, 1 in 9 women will be diagnosed during their lifetime, amounting to >8,000 new breast cancers per year. Each year around 1,400 patients die from their disease. A comprehensive report entitled "highlighted several areas in need of more research", including how weight, alcohol consumption, smoking, host metabolism and inflammatory and immunological factors’ impact on cancer progression (1). Our group has assembled a populationbased cohort of primary breast cancer patients in Lund, Sweden since 2002. Our analyses have shown significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) for breast cancer patients with ER-positive tumors and large total breast volume (≥850 ml) regardless of age, WHR and BMI (2). Preoperative BMI was not significantly associated with DFS after postoperative weight change was taken into account. The response to endocrine therapy was associated with germline genotypes of the androgen receptor (3) and COX2 (4), while tamoxifen response was not associated with CYP2D6 genotypes (5). Instead, coffee intake was associated with significantly better response to tamoxifen treatment with less than half the risk of early breast cancer events in patients who consumed 2+ cups/day compared to 0-1 cups/day (6). This was not observed in patients treated with aromatase inhibitors. Further, a low to moderate alcohol intake was associated with significantly longer DFS but only in patients with node-positive disease (7). This may, in part, be mediated by the fact that patients with two out of the three clinical markers “low alcohol intake, current smoking and normal BMI” were significantly less likely to adhere to their endocrine treatment (8).Taken together, our data suggest that body constitution, lifestyle and genetic factors jointly impact on the prognosis and treatment response in breast cancer, stressing the importance of taking host factors into consideration.},
  author       = {Jernström, Helena},
  issn         = {1791-7530},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Conference Abstract},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {5974--5975},
  publisher    = {International Institute of Cancer Research},
  series       = {Anticancer research},
  title        = {Joint effects of genes, body constitution, and lifestyle: exploring novel pathways to predict prognosis and response to therapy in breast cancer},
  url          = {http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/34/10/5761.full.pdf+html},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2014},
}