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Attitude towards hpv vaccination and the intention to get vaccinated among female university students in health schools in jordan

Sallam, Malik LU ; Al-Mahzoum, Kholoud ; Eid, Huda ; Assaf, Areej M. ; Abdaljaleel, Maram ; Al-Abbadi, Mousa and Mahafzah, Azmi (2021) In Vaccines 9(12).
Abstract

Cervical cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women worldwide. The availability of prophylactic vaccines for high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection represents an important advancement in the prevention of cervical cancer. In Jordan, the availability of the HPV vaccination is restricted to individuals who are willing to pay. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the willingness and attitude of female university students in health schools/faculties in Jordan to get HPV vaccination and their knowledge about the virus. A self-administered online questionnaire was distributed in October 2021, which comprised 27 items to evaluate HPV knowledge, history of HPV vaccination, intentions to get the HPV... (More)

Cervical cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women worldwide. The availability of prophylactic vaccines for high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection represents an important advancement in the prevention of cervical cancer. In Jordan, the availability of the HPV vaccination is restricted to individuals who are willing to pay. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the willingness and attitude of female university students in health schools/faculties in Jordan to get HPV vaccination and their knowledge about the virus. A self-administered online questionnaire was distributed in October 2021, which comprised 27 items to evaluate HPV knowledge, history of HPV vaccination, intentions to get the HPV vaccine, and the reason(s) behind vaccine refusal for those who rejected vaccination. The study sample comprised 836 participants: medical students (39.7%), pharmacy students (26.0%), dental students (21.2%), and nursing students (13.2%). Only 524 participants had heard of HPV prior to the study (62.7%), of which 48.7% knew about the availability of HPV vaccines. The lowest level of HPV knowledge was observed among nursing students. Only 19/524 students reported a history of HPV vaccination (3.6%). The overall willingness to receive HPV vaccination if provided freely was 75.0%, while only 16.0% were willing to pay for the vaccine. The most common reason for HPV vaccine rejection was the perceived low risk to get HPV infection. Significantly higher intentions to get HPV vaccination were found among older participants and medical students. The embrace of vaccine conspiracy beliefs was associated with a significantly less willingness to get the HPV vaccination (p < 0.001). Dependence on the internet/social media as the source of HPV knowledge was associated with a significantly lower intention to get HPV vaccination (p = 0.002). The coverage of the HPV vaccination among female university students in health schools in Jordan appeared extremely low; however, three-fourths of the students who had heard of HPV were willing to receive the HPV vaccination if provided freely. Complacency appeared as a major factor for HPV vaccine rejection. Increasing the levels of knowledge and awareness of HPV infection and its association with cervical cancer through reliable sources is recommended. This can be helpful for the individual benefit of the students besides the potentially positive role they can play in community education. Countering vaccine conspiracy beliefs with proper education and awareness programs can be helpful to appraise the role of HPV vaccines in cancer prevention.

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author
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Awareness, Immunization, Knowledge, Sexually transmitted infection, Tumor, Undergraduate students, Vaccine hesitancy, Vaccine rejection
in
Vaccines
volume
9
issue
12
article number
1432
publisher
MDPI AG
external identifiers
  • scopus:85121545910
  • pmid:34960177
ISSN
2076-393X
DOI
10.3390/vaccines9121432
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
Publisher Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
id
b3615eff-1d72-4ca5-b612-7925e5334a91
date added to LUP
2022-02-21 08:58:09
date last changed
2022-09-25 03:24:28
@article{b3615eff-1d72-4ca5-b612-7925e5334a91,
  abstract     = {{<p>Cervical cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women worldwide. The availability of prophylactic vaccines for high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection represents an important advancement in the prevention of cervical cancer. In Jordan, the availability of the HPV vaccination is restricted to individuals who are willing to pay. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the willingness and attitude of female university students in health schools/faculties in Jordan to get HPV vaccination and their knowledge about the virus. A self-administered online questionnaire was distributed in October 2021, which comprised 27 items to evaluate HPV knowledge, history of HPV vaccination, intentions to get the HPV vaccine, and the reason(s) behind vaccine refusal for those who rejected vaccination. The study sample comprised 836 participants: medical students (39.7%), pharmacy students (26.0%), dental students (21.2%), and nursing students (13.2%). Only 524 participants had heard of HPV prior to the study (62.7%), of which 48.7% knew about the availability of HPV vaccines. The lowest level of HPV knowledge was observed among nursing students. Only 19/524 students reported a history of HPV vaccination (3.6%). The overall willingness to receive HPV vaccination if provided freely was 75.0%, while only 16.0% were willing to pay for the vaccine. The most common reason for HPV vaccine rejection was the perceived low risk to get HPV infection. Significantly higher intentions to get HPV vaccination were found among older participants and medical students. The embrace of vaccine conspiracy beliefs was associated with a significantly less willingness to get the HPV vaccination (p &lt; 0.001). Dependence on the internet/social media as the source of HPV knowledge was associated with a significantly lower intention to get HPV vaccination (p = 0.002). The coverage of the HPV vaccination among female university students in health schools in Jordan appeared extremely low; however, three-fourths of the students who had heard of HPV were willing to receive the HPV vaccination if provided freely. Complacency appeared as a major factor for HPV vaccine rejection. Increasing the levels of knowledge and awareness of HPV infection and its association with cervical cancer through reliable sources is recommended. This can be helpful for the individual benefit of the students besides the potentially positive role they can play in community education. Countering vaccine conspiracy beliefs with proper education and awareness programs can be helpful to appraise the role of HPV vaccines in cancer prevention.</p>}},
  author       = {{Sallam, Malik and Al-Mahzoum, Kholoud and Eid, Huda and Assaf, Areej M. and Abdaljaleel, Maram and Al-Abbadi, Mousa and Mahafzah, Azmi}},
  issn         = {{2076-393X}},
  keywords     = {{Awareness; Immunization; Knowledge; Sexually transmitted infection; Tumor; Undergraduate students; Vaccine hesitancy; Vaccine rejection}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{12}},
  publisher    = {{MDPI AG}},
  series       = {{Vaccines}},
  title        = {{Attitude towards hpv vaccination and the intention to get vaccinated among female university students in health schools in jordan}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9121432}},
  doi          = {{10.3390/vaccines9121432}},
  volume       = {{9}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}