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Loneliness, health and mortality

Henriksen, J.; Larsen, E. R.; Mattisson, C. LU and Andersson, N. W. (2017) In Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
Abstract

Aims.: Literature suggests an association between loneliness and mortality for both males and females. Yet, the linkage of loneliness to mortality is not thoroughly examined, and need to be replicated with a long follow-up time. This study assessed the association between loneliness and mortality, including associations to gender, in 1363 adult swedes. Methods.: This community-based prospective cohort study from the Swedish Lundby Study included 1363 individuals of whom 296 individuals (21.7%) were identified as lonely with use of semi-structured interviews in 1997. The cohort was followed until 2011 and survival analyses were used to estimate the relative risk of death. Results.: Death occurred with an incidence rate of 2.63 per 100... (More)

Aims.: Literature suggests an association between loneliness and mortality for both males and females. Yet, the linkage of loneliness to mortality is not thoroughly examined, and need to be replicated with a long follow-up time. This study assessed the association between loneliness and mortality, including associations to gender, in 1363 adult swedes. Methods.: This community-based prospective cohort study from the Swedish Lundby Study included 1363 individuals of whom 296 individuals (21.7%) were identified as lonely with use of semi-structured interviews in 1997. The cohort was followed until 2011 and survival analyses were used to estimate the relative risk of death. Results.: Death occurred with an incidence rate of 2.63 per 100 person-years and 2.09 per 100 person-years for lonely and non-lonely individuals, respectively. In crude analysis, loneliness was associated with a significant increased mortality risk of 27% compared with non-lonely individuals [hazard ratio (HR) 1.27; 95% CI 1.01–1.60]. Unadjusted, lonely females had a significant increased risk (HR 1.76; 95% CI 1.31–2.34) and adjusted insignificant increased mortality risk of 27% (HR 1.27; 95% CI 0.92–1.74), compared with non-lonely females. Lonely males were found to have an adjusted significant decreased risk of mortality (HR 0.50; 95% CI 0.32–0.80), compared with non-lonely males. Conclusions.: Findings suggest an association between loneliness and increased risk of mortality and that gender differences may exist, which have not been previously reported. If replicated, our results indicate that loneliness may have differential physical implications in some subgroups. Future studies are needed to further investigate the influence of gender on the relationship.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Community mental health, prospective study, social network, social support
in
Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
pages
6 pages
publisher
Il Pensiero scientifico editore
external identifiers
  • scopus:85033392586
ISSN
2045-7960
DOI
10.1017/S2045796017000580
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
b437f50d-8ea7-4c40-9d2a-06be33cf43b3
date added to LUP
2017-11-23 08:35:16
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:26:38
@article{b437f50d-8ea7-4c40-9d2a-06be33cf43b3,
  abstract     = {<p>Aims.: Literature suggests an association between loneliness and mortality for both males and females. Yet, the linkage of loneliness to mortality is not thoroughly examined, and need to be replicated with a long follow-up time. This study assessed the association between loneliness and mortality, including associations to gender, in 1363 adult swedes. Methods.: This community-based prospective cohort study from the Swedish Lundby Study included 1363 individuals of whom 296 individuals (21.7%) were identified as lonely with use of semi-structured interviews in 1997. The cohort was followed until 2011 and survival analyses were used to estimate the relative risk of death. Results.: Death occurred with an incidence rate of 2.63 per 100 person-years and 2.09 per 100 person-years for lonely and non-lonely individuals, respectively. In crude analysis, loneliness was associated with a significant increased mortality risk of 27% compared with non-lonely individuals [hazard ratio (HR) 1.27; 95% CI 1.01–1.60]. Unadjusted, lonely females had a significant increased risk (HR 1.76; 95% CI 1.31–2.34) and adjusted insignificant increased mortality risk of 27% (HR 1.27; 95% CI 0.92–1.74), compared with non-lonely females. Lonely males were found to have an adjusted significant decreased risk of mortality (HR 0.50; 95% CI 0.32–0.80), compared with non-lonely males. Conclusions.: Findings suggest an association between loneliness and increased risk of mortality and that gender differences may exist, which have not been previously reported. If replicated, our results indicate that loneliness may have differential physical implications in some subgroups. Future studies are needed to further investigate the influence of gender on the relationship.</p>},
  author       = {Henriksen, J. and Larsen, E. R. and Mattisson, C. and Andersson, N. W.},
  issn         = {2045-7960},
  keyword      = {Community mental health,prospective study,social network,social support},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  pages        = {6},
  publisher    = {Il Pensiero scientifico editore},
  series       = {Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences},
  title        = {Loneliness, health and mortality},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S2045796017000580},
  year         = {2017},
}