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Ethanol impairs coagulation and fibrinolysis in whole blood: a study performed with rotational thromboelastometry.

Engström, Martin LU ; Schött, Ulf LU and Reinstrup, Peter LU (2006) In Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis 17(8). p.661-665
Abstract
The objective was to study the effects of ethanol on coagulation and fibrinolysis in whole blood. Blood samples from healthy volunteers were analyzed before and after in-vitro addition of ethanol in order to achieve ethanol concentrations of 0, 1, 2 and 4[per mille sign], respectively (0, 22, 44 and 88 mmol/l). Coagulation and fibrinolysis were then assessed using rotational thromboelastometry. We found that increasing ethanol levels increasingly impaired coagulation as evaluated with rotational thromboelastometry, with a maximum prolongation of the clot formation time of 118% at an ethanol level of 4[per mille sign] (P < 0.000001). We also found a very strong impairment of fibrinolysis already at an ethanol level of 1[per mille sign].... (More)
The objective was to study the effects of ethanol on coagulation and fibrinolysis in whole blood. Blood samples from healthy volunteers were analyzed before and after in-vitro addition of ethanol in order to achieve ethanol concentrations of 0, 1, 2 and 4[per mille sign], respectively (0, 22, 44 and 88 mmol/l). Coagulation and fibrinolysis were then assessed using rotational thromboelastometry. We found that increasing ethanol levels increasingly impaired coagulation as evaluated with rotational thromboelastometry, with a maximum prolongation of the clot formation time of 118% at an ethanol level of 4[per mille sign] (P < 0.000001). We also found a very strong impairment of fibrinolysis already at an ethanol level of 1[per mille sign]. This is the first study assessing the effects of ethanol on coagulation and fibrinolysis in a whole blood model. The impairment of coagulation is similar in nature to the impairment found in patients suffering from hypothermia. The impairment is at a level that may be of clinical importance (e.g. in patients suffering from trauma). The inhibition of fibrinolysis is obvious already at an ethanol level of 1[per mille sign] and it may be a contributing factor to the increased amount of coronary and cerebrovascular ischemic events after binge drinking. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
fibrinolysis, alcohol, ethanol, thromboelastometry, rotational, coagulation
in
Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis
volume
17
issue
8
pages
661 - 665
publisher
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000242672700009
  • scopus:33751031875
ISSN
1473-5733
DOI
10.1097/MBC.0b013e32801010b7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b603c75b-8a2b-4d43-ac02-b079e63fd496 (old id 163248)
date added to LUP
2007-07-09 14:13:58
date last changed
2019-04-02 01:45:34
@article{b603c75b-8a2b-4d43-ac02-b079e63fd496,
  abstract     = {The objective was to study the effects of ethanol on coagulation and fibrinolysis in whole blood. Blood samples from healthy volunteers were analyzed before and after in-vitro addition of ethanol in order to achieve ethanol concentrations of 0, 1, 2 and 4[per mille sign], respectively (0, 22, 44 and 88 mmol/l). Coagulation and fibrinolysis were then assessed using rotational thromboelastometry. We found that increasing ethanol levels increasingly impaired coagulation as evaluated with rotational thromboelastometry, with a maximum prolongation of the clot formation time of 118% at an ethanol level of 4[per mille sign] (P &lt; 0.000001). We also found a very strong impairment of fibrinolysis already at an ethanol level of 1[per mille sign]. This is the first study assessing the effects of ethanol on coagulation and fibrinolysis in a whole blood model. The impairment of coagulation is similar in nature to the impairment found in patients suffering from hypothermia. The impairment is at a level that may be of clinical importance (e.g. in patients suffering from trauma). The inhibition of fibrinolysis is obvious already at an ethanol level of 1[per mille sign] and it may be a contributing factor to the increased amount of coronary and cerebrovascular ischemic events after binge drinking.},
  author       = {Engström, Martin and Schött, Ulf and Reinstrup, Peter},
  issn         = {1473-5733},
  keyword      = {fibrinolysis,alcohol,ethanol,thromboelastometry,rotational,coagulation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {661--665},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams and Wilkins},
  series       = {Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis},
  title        = {Ethanol impairs coagulation and fibrinolysis in whole blood: a study performed with rotational thromboelastometry.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MBC.0b013e32801010b7},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2006},
}