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Wing morphology of the butterfly Coenonympha arcania in Europe : Traces of both historical isolation in glacial refugia and current adaptation

Cassel-Lundhagen, Anna ; Schmitt, Thomas ; Wahlberg, Niklas LU ; Sarvašová, Lenka ; Konvička, Martin ; Ryrholm, Nils and Kaňuch, Peter (2020) In Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research 58(4). p.929-943
Abstract

In this study, we examined the evolutionary outcome of and interplay between historic isolation and current selection pressures on traits more or less closely connected to fitness in the Pearly Heath butterfly (Coenonympha arcania) across its range in Europe. We hypothesized that a trait mean is more related to historic events if it has low connection to fitness, while a trait more closely connected with fitness is expected to have a mean that relates more to current selection pressures. In order to test this, we collected 322 butterflies from across the species range in Europe and measured five wing traits relating to size and color patterns. To infer a phylogeographic history for each individual, we sequenced a 594 bp fragment of the... (More)

In this study, we examined the evolutionary outcome of and interplay between historic isolation and current selection pressures on traits more or less closely connected to fitness in the Pearly Heath butterfly (Coenonympha arcania) across its range in Europe. We hypothesized that a trait mean is more related to historic events if it has low connection to fitness, while a trait more closely connected with fitness is expected to have a mean that relates more to current selection pressures. In order to test this, we collected 322 butterflies from across the species range in Europe and measured five wing traits relating to size and color patterns. To infer a phylogeographic history for each individual, we sequenced a 594 bp fragment of the COI gene. The morphological data were then analyzed in relation to selected climatic variables and the history of individuals to disentangle which factors best correlated with morphological variation. The results supported our hypothesis in that wing sizes correlated with summer precipitation but not with its inferred location during the last glaciation. Eyespot position, on the other hand, correlated with the history of individuals but not with the analyzed climatic indicators. The sizes of the black spot and the white band, two traits that were expected to have intermediate selection pressure, were associated with both history and current conditions. Thus, this study illustrates the fascinating interplay between events and processes that lead to a specific evolutionary outcome.

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author
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
adaptation, clinal variation, environmental factors, Lepidoptera, phylogeography
in
Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research
volume
58
issue
4
pages
15 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85078596470
ISSN
0947-5745
DOI
10.1111/jzs.12360
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b81bb5b2-7294-4ee7-bee3-e5ceaa53a111
date added to LUP
2020-02-10 13:24:35
date last changed
2020-12-09 15:25:05
@article{b81bb5b2-7294-4ee7-bee3-e5ceaa53a111,
  abstract     = {<p>In this study, we examined the evolutionary outcome of and interplay between historic isolation and current selection pressures on traits more or less closely connected to fitness in the Pearly Heath butterfly (Coenonympha arcania) across its range in Europe. We hypothesized that a trait mean is more related to historic events if it has low connection to fitness, while a trait more closely connected with fitness is expected to have a mean that relates more to current selection pressures. In order to test this, we collected 322 butterflies from across the species range in Europe and measured five wing traits relating to size and color patterns. To infer a phylogeographic history for each individual, we sequenced a 594 bp fragment of the COI gene. The morphological data were then analyzed in relation to selected climatic variables and the history of individuals to disentangle which factors best correlated with morphological variation. The results supported our hypothesis in that wing sizes correlated with summer precipitation but not with its inferred location during the last glaciation. Eyespot position, on the other hand, correlated with the history of individuals but not with the analyzed climatic indicators. The sizes of the black spot and the white band, two traits that were expected to have intermediate selection pressure, were associated with both history and current conditions. Thus, this study illustrates the fascinating interplay between events and processes that lead to a specific evolutionary outcome.</p>},
  author       = {Cassel-Lundhagen, Anna and Schmitt, Thomas and Wahlberg, Niklas and Sarvašová, Lenka and Konvička, Martin and Ryrholm, Nils and Kaňuch, Peter},
  issn         = {0947-5745},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {929--943},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research},
  title        = {Wing morphology of the butterfly Coenonympha arcania in Europe : Traces of both historical isolation in glacial refugia and current adaptation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jzs.12360},
  doi          = {10.1111/jzs.12360},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2020},
}