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Mobility device use in people with Parkinson's disease : A 3-year follow-up study

Kader, M. LU ; Jonasson, S. B. LU ; Iwarsson, S. LU ; Odin, P. LU and Nilsson, M. H. LU (2018) In Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 138(1). p.70-77
Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate how the use and perceived unmet need of mobility devices (MD) in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) evolve over a 3-year period. Methods: The study reports baseline assessments (n = 255) and comparisons for participants with complete data at baseline and the 3-year follow-up (n = 165). Structured questions addressed the use and perceived unmet need of various MDs indoor and outdoor (eg, canes, wheeled walkers, and manual and powered wheelchairs). McNemar tests were used to investigate differences over time. Results: In the total sample at baseline, 30% and 52% of the participants reported using MDs indoors and outdoors, respectively. Among those with complete data also at the 3-year... (More)

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate how the use and perceived unmet need of mobility devices (MD) in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) evolve over a 3-year period. Methods: The study reports baseline assessments (n = 255) and comparisons for participants with complete data at baseline and the 3-year follow-up (n = 165). Structured questions addressed the use and perceived unmet need of various MDs indoor and outdoor (eg, canes, wheeled walkers, and manual and powered wheelchairs). McNemar tests were used to investigate differences over time. Results: In the total sample at baseline, 30% and 52% of the participants reported using MDs indoors and outdoors, respectively. Among those with complete data also at the 3-year follow-up, the proportion of participants using MDs increased significantly (P < .001) from 22% to 40% for indoors and from 48% to 66% for outdoors, with transition of MD toward more assistive potential (ie, wheeled walker and manual wheelchair). Wheeled walkers were the most commonly used MD indoors as well as outdoors on both occasions. Among the users of multiple MDs, the most common combination was cane and wheeled walker on both occasions. The proportion of participants who reported a perceived unmet need of MDs was 5% at baseline, whereas it was 21%, 3 years later. Conclusions: The use and perceived unmet need of MDs in people with PD increase over time. There is a need for addressing MDs at clinical follow-ups of people with PD, with continuous attention in primary health care and municipality contexts.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Assistive devices, Canes, Mobility, Parkinson's disease, Walking aids, Wheelchairs, Wheeled walkers
in
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
volume
138
issue
1
pages
70 - 77
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85045704891
ISSN
0001-6314
DOI
10.1111/ane.12942
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b9600c48-74b1-4cad-81a8-390b0976e21c
date added to LUP
2018-05-04 14:12:41
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:16:13
@article{b9600c48-74b1-4cad-81a8-390b0976e21c,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: This study aimed to investigate how the use and perceived unmet need of mobility devices (MD) in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) evolve over a 3-year period. Methods: The study reports baseline assessments (n = 255) and comparisons for participants with complete data at baseline and the 3-year follow-up (n = 165). Structured questions addressed the use and perceived unmet need of various MDs indoor and outdoor (eg, canes, wheeled walkers, and manual and powered wheelchairs). McNemar tests were used to investigate differences over time. Results: In the total sample at baseline, 30% and 52% of the participants reported using MDs indoors and outdoors, respectively. Among those with complete data also at the 3-year follow-up, the proportion of participants using MDs increased significantly (P &lt; .001) from 22% to 40% for indoors and from 48% to 66% for outdoors, with transition of MD toward more assistive potential (ie, wheeled walker and manual wheelchair). Wheeled walkers were the most commonly used MD indoors as well as outdoors on both occasions. Among the users of multiple MDs, the most common combination was cane and wheeled walker on both occasions. The proportion of participants who reported a perceived unmet need of MDs was 5% at baseline, whereas it was 21%, 3 years later. Conclusions: The use and perceived unmet need of MDs in people with PD increase over time. There is a need for addressing MDs at clinical follow-ups of people with PD, with continuous attention in primary health care and municipality contexts.</p>},
  author       = {Kader, M. and Jonasson, S. B. and Iwarsson, S. and Odin, P. and Nilsson, M. H.},
  issn         = {0001-6314},
  keyword      = {Assistive devices,Canes,Mobility,Parkinson's disease,Walking aids,Wheelchairs,Wheeled walkers},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {70--77},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Neurologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Mobility device use in people with Parkinson's disease : A 3-year follow-up study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ane.12942},
  volume       = {138},
  year         = {2018},
}