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Education immigration and income as risk factors for hemoglobin a1c >70 mmol/mol when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes in adult : A population-based cohort study

Martinell, Mats; Pingel, Ronnie; Hallqvist, Johan; Dorkhan, Mozhgan LU ; Groop, Leif LU ; Rosengren, Anders LU ; Storm, Petter LU and Stålhammar, Jan (2017) In BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care 5(1).
Abstract

Objectives The aim of this research is to study education, income and immigration as risk factors for high hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c >70 mmol/mol (8.6%)) when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) or latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA). Research design and methods Patients were included from the All New Diabetics in Scania study (2008-2013). Level of education, disposable income and immigration year were retrieved from the longitudinal integrated database for labour market research (LISA) register compiled by Statistics Sweden. Logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs for HbA1c >70 mmol/mol (8.6%) at diagnosis. Results A total of 3794 patients with incident T2D (n=3 525) or LADA (n=269) were included. Patients... (More)

Objectives The aim of this research is to study education, income and immigration as risk factors for high hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c >70 mmol/mol (8.6%)) when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) or latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA). Research design and methods Patients were included from the All New Diabetics in Scania study (2008-2013). Level of education, disposable income and immigration year were retrieved from the longitudinal integrated database for labour market research (LISA) register compiled by Statistics Sweden. Logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs for HbA1c >70 mmol/mol (8.6%) at diagnosis. Results A total of 3794 patients with incident T2D (n=3 525) or LADA (n=269) were included. Patients with T2D with a low (≤9 years) or medium (10-12 years) levels of education were more likely to have high HbA1c at diagnosis compared with patients with T2D with a high (>12 years) level of education (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.08 to1.66, OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54). Low-income patients with T2D (<60% of median) were more likely to have high HbA1c at diagnosis compared with high-income patients withT2D (>150% of median) (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.79). Conclusions Patients with lower levels of education or low income and are more likely to have HbA1c is >70 mmol/ mol (8.6%) when diagnosed with T2D. An understanding of how socioeconomic position influences the clinical presentation at diagnosis may facilitate screening programs designed to target populations at risk for delayed diagnosis.

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author
organization
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type
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publication status
published
subject
in
BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care
volume
5
issue
1
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:85019208326
ISSN
2052-4897
DOI
10.1136/bmjdrc-2016-000346
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b9658775-a76c-4331-9f5d-f1ff8094d61a
date added to LUP
2017-06-08 14:24:13
date last changed
2017-09-08 03:00:18
@article{b9658775-a76c-4331-9f5d-f1ff8094d61a,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives The aim of this research is to study education, income and immigration as risk factors for high hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c &gt;70 mmol/mol (8.6%)) when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) or latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA). Research design and methods Patients were included from the All New Diabetics in Scania study (2008-2013). Level of education, disposable income and immigration year were retrieved from the longitudinal integrated database for labour market research (LISA) register compiled by Statistics Sweden. Logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs for HbA1c &gt;70 mmol/mol (8.6%) at diagnosis. Results A total of 3794 patients with incident T2D (n=3 525) or LADA (n=269) were included. Patients with T2D with a low (≤9 years) or medium (10-12 years) levels of education were more likely to have high HbA1c at diagnosis compared with patients with T2D with a high (&gt;12 years) level of education (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.08 to1.66, OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54). Low-income patients with T2D (&lt;60% of median) were more likely to have high HbA1c at diagnosis compared with high-income patients withT2D (&gt;150% of median) (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.79). Conclusions Patients with lower levels of education or low income and are more likely to have HbA1c is &gt;70 mmol/ mol (8.6%) when diagnosed with T2D. An understanding of how socioeconomic position influences the clinical presentation at diagnosis may facilitate screening programs designed to target populations at risk for delayed diagnosis.</p>},
  articleno    = {e000346},
  author       = {Martinell, Mats and Pingel, Ronnie and Hallqvist, Johan and Dorkhan, Mozhgan and Groop, Leif and Rosengren, Anders and Storm, Petter and Stålhammar, Jan},
  issn         = {2052-4897},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care},
  title        = {Education immigration and income as risk factors for hemoglobin a1c >70 mmol/mol when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes in adult : A population-based cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjdrc-2016-000346},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2017},
}