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Weight gain and blood pressure

Sundström, Johan ; Lind, Lars ; Lampa, Erik ; Angerås, Oskar ; Bachus, Erasmus LU ; Bergström, Göran ; Carlberg, Bo ; Engström, Gunnar LU ; Engvall, Jan E and Eriksson, Mats , et al. (2020) In Journal of Hypertension 38(3). p.387-394
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Although the causality of the obesity--hypertension association is established, the potential for prevention is not. We hypothesized that weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life is associated with higher mid-life blood pressure.

METHODS: We investigated the hypothesis using a large contemporaneous population-based mid-life cohort of men and women aged 50-64 years. Recalled body weight at age 20 years was self-reported, and mid-life body weight and office blood pressures were measured in accordance with a detailed protocol.

RESULTS: On average, men had gained 14.9 (95% CI 14.6-15.2) kg of weight, and women 14.6 (95% CI 14.4-14.9) kg, between age 20 years and the mid-life examination, corresponding to 0.40... (More)

OBJECTIVE: Although the causality of the obesity--hypertension association is established, the potential for prevention is not. We hypothesized that weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life is associated with higher mid-life blood pressure.

METHODS: We investigated the hypothesis using a large contemporaneous population-based mid-life cohort of men and women aged 50-64 years. Recalled body weight at age 20 years was self-reported, and mid-life body weight and office blood pressures were measured in accordance with a detailed protocol.

RESULTS: On average, men had gained 14.9 (95% CI 14.6-15.2) kg of weight, and women 14.6 (95% CI 14.4-14.9) kg, between age 20 years and the mid-life examination, corresponding to 0.40 (95% CI 0.39-0.41) kg/year for men and women. Both weight at age 20 years and weight at the mid-life examination were associated with mid-life blood pressures. On average, a 10 kg weight increase between age 20 years and mid-life was associated with 2.2 (95% CI 0.9-3.5) mmHg higher systolic and 1.7 (95% CI 0.9-2.5) mmHg higher diastolic mid-life blood pressure in men, and 3.2 (2.5-4.0) mmHg higher systolic and 2.4 (1.9-2.9) mmHg higher diastolic mid-life blood pressure in women. Mid-life weight was more closely associated than weight at age 20 years with mid-life blood pressure. For a given mid-life weight, blood pressure was higher in persons with higher weight gain from age 20 years.

CONCLUSION: In sum, weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life was associated with higher mid-life blood pressure. The magnitude of the association indicates a potentially great public health impact of strategies to prevent weight gain throughout adulthood.

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publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Hypertension
volume
38
issue
3
pages
8 pages
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:31764589
  • scopus:85079089757
ISSN
1473-5598
DOI
10.1097/HJH.0000000000002298
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ba56f234-4f43-47d8-a258-376874ff203b
date added to LUP
2020-03-17 10:26:33
date last changed
2021-04-06 01:35:21
@article{ba56f234-4f43-47d8-a258-376874ff203b,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVE: Although the causality of the obesity--hypertension association is established, the potential for prevention is not. We hypothesized that weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life is associated with higher mid-life blood pressure.</p><p>METHODS: We investigated the hypothesis using a large contemporaneous population-based mid-life cohort of men and women aged 50-64 years. Recalled body weight at age 20 years was self-reported, and mid-life body weight and office blood pressures were measured in accordance with a detailed protocol.</p><p>RESULTS: On average, men had gained 14.9 (95% CI 14.6-15.2) kg of weight, and women 14.6 (95% CI 14.4-14.9) kg, between age 20 years and the mid-life examination, corresponding to 0.40 (95% CI 0.39-0.41) kg/year for men and women. Both weight at age 20 years and weight at the mid-life examination were associated with mid-life blood pressures. On average, a 10 kg weight increase between age 20 years and mid-life was associated with 2.2 (95% CI 0.9-3.5) mmHg higher systolic and 1.7 (95% CI 0.9-2.5) mmHg higher diastolic mid-life blood pressure in men, and 3.2 (2.5-4.0) mmHg higher systolic and 2.4 (1.9-2.9) mmHg higher diastolic mid-life blood pressure in women. Mid-life weight was more closely associated than weight at age 20 years with mid-life blood pressure. For a given mid-life weight, blood pressure was higher in persons with higher weight gain from age 20 years.</p><p>CONCLUSION: In sum, weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life was associated with higher mid-life blood pressure. The magnitude of the association indicates a potentially great public health impact of strategies to prevent weight gain throughout adulthood.</p>},
  author       = {Sundström, Johan and Lind, Lars and Lampa, Erik and Angerås, Oskar and Bachus, Erasmus and Bergström, Göran and Carlberg, Bo and Engström, Gunnar and Engvall, Jan E and Eriksson, Mats and Gigante, Bruna and Hagström, Emil and Hjelmgren, Ola and Jansson, Jan-Håkan and Jernberg, Tomas and Mannila, Maria and Nyström, Fredrik H and Oldgren, Jonas and Persson, Margaretha and Sandström, Anette and Swahn, Eva and Söderberg, Stefan and Torén, Kjell and Östgren, Carl Johan and Rosengren, Annika},
  issn         = {1473-5598},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {387--394},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of Hypertension},
  title        = {Weight gain and blood pressure},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000002298},
  doi          = {10.1097/HJH.0000000000002298},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2020},
}