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Quantitative Imaging of Ozone Vapor Using Photofragmentation Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF)

Larsson, Kajsa LU ; Hot, Dina LU ; Ehn, Andreas LU ; Lantz, Andreas LU ; Weng, Wubin LU ; Aldén, Marcus LU and Bood, Joakim LU (2017) In Applied Spectroscopy 71(7). p.1578-1585
Abstract

In the present work, the spectral properties of gaseous ozone (O3) have been investigated aiming to perform quantitative concentration imaging of ozone by using a single laser pulse at 248 nm from a KrF excimer laser. The O3 molecule is first photodissociated by the laser pulse into two fragments, O and O2. Then the same laser pulse electronically excites the O2 fragment, which is vibrationally hot, whereupon fluorescence is emitted. The fluorescence intensity is found to be proportional to the concentration of ozone. Both emission and absorption characteristics have been investigated, as well as how the laser fluence affects the fluorescence signal. Quantitative ozone imaging data have been... (More)

In the present work, the spectral properties of gaseous ozone (O3) have been investigated aiming to perform quantitative concentration imaging of ozone by using a single laser pulse at 248 nm from a KrF excimer laser. The O3 molecule is first photodissociated by the laser pulse into two fragments, O and O2. Then the same laser pulse electronically excites the O2 fragment, which is vibrationally hot, whereupon fluorescence is emitted. The fluorescence intensity is found to be proportional to the concentration of ozone. Both emission and absorption characteristics have been investigated, as well as how the laser fluence affects the fluorescence signal. Quantitative ozone imaging data have been achieved based on calibration measurements in known mixtures of O3. In addition, a simultaneous study of the emission intensity captured by an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera and a spectrograph has been performed. The results show that any signal contribution not stemming from ozone is negligible compared to the strong fluorescence induced by the O2 fragment, thus proving interference-free ozone imaging. The single-shot detection limit has been estimated to ∼400 ppm. The authors believe that the presented technique offers a valuable tool applicable in various research fields, such as plasma sterilization, water and soil remediation, and plasma-assisted combustion.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
imaging, laser-induced fluorescence, LIF, Ozone, photofragmentation
in
Applied Spectroscopy
volume
71
issue
7
pages
8 pages
publisher
Society for Applied Spectroscopy
external identifiers
  • scopus:85021725634
  • wos:000404688100019
ISSN
0003-7028
DOI
10.1177/0003702817691528
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bb1d978f-c608-44aa-b783-f650a2f433bc
date added to LUP
2017-07-18 14:44:34
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:38:34
@article{bb1d978f-c608-44aa-b783-f650a2f433bc,
  abstract     = {<p>In the present work, the spectral properties of gaseous ozone (O<sub>3</sub>) have been investigated aiming to perform quantitative concentration imaging of ozone by using a single laser pulse at 248 nm from a KrF excimer laser. The O<sub>3</sub> molecule is first photodissociated by the laser pulse into two fragments, O and O<sub>2</sub>. Then the same laser pulse electronically excites the O<sub>2</sub> fragment, which is vibrationally hot, whereupon fluorescence is emitted. The fluorescence intensity is found to be proportional to the concentration of ozone. Both emission and absorption characteristics have been investigated, as well as how the laser fluence affects the fluorescence signal. Quantitative ozone imaging data have been achieved based on calibration measurements in known mixtures of O<sub>3</sub>. In addition, a simultaneous study of the emission intensity captured by an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera and a spectrograph has been performed. The results show that any signal contribution not stemming from ozone is negligible compared to the strong fluorescence induced by the O<sub>2</sub> fragment, thus proving interference-free ozone imaging. The single-shot detection limit has been estimated to ∼400 ppm. The authors believe that the presented technique offers a valuable tool applicable in various research fields, such as plasma sterilization, water and soil remediation, and plasma-assisted combustion.</p>},
  author       = {Larsson, Kajsa and Hot, Dina and Ehn, Andreas and Lantz, Andreas and Weng, Wubin and Aldén, Marcus and Bood, Joakim},
  issn         = {0003-7028},
  keyword      = {imaging,laser-induced fluorescence,LIF,Ozone,photofragmentation},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1578--1585},
  publisher    = {Society for Applied Spectroscopy},
  series       = {Applied Spectroscopy},
  title        = {Quantitative Imaging of Ozone Vapor Using Photofragmentation Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003702817691528},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2017},
}