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Nano-structuring for molecular motor control

Lard, Mercy LU ; Ten Siethoff, L.; Kumar, S.; Persson, M.; te Kronnie, G.; Månsson, A. and Linke, H. LU (2015) NATO Advanced Study Institute on Nano-Structures for Optics and Photonics: Optical Strategies for Enhancing Sensing, Imaging, Communication, and Energy Conversion p.459-459
Abstract (Swedish)
The interaction of self-propelled biological molecular-motors and
cytoskeletal filaments holds relevance for a variety of applications such as
biosensing, drug screening, diagnostics and biocomputation. The use of these
systems for lab-on-a-chip biotechnology applications shows potential for
replacement of microfluidic flow by active, molecular-motor driven transport of
filaments. The ability to control, confine and detect motile objects in such a system
is possible by development of nanostructured surfaces for on-chip applications and
fundamental studies of molecular-motors. Here we describe the localized detection
(Lard et al., Sci Rep 3:1092, 2013) and fast transport of actin filaments by... (More)
The interaction of self-propelled biological molecular-motors and
cytoskeletal filaments holds relevance for a variety of applications such as
biosensing, drug screening, diagnostics and biocomputation. The use of these
systems for lab-on-a-chip biotechnology applications shows potential for
replacement of microfluidic flow by active, molecular-motor driven transport of
filaments. The ability to control, confine and detect motile objects in such a system
is possible by development of nanostructured surfaces for on-chip applications and
fundamental studies of molecular-motors. Here we describe the localized detection
(Lard et al., Sci Rep 3:1092, 2013) and fast transport of actin filaments by myosin
molecular-motors (Lard et al., Biosens Biolectron 48(0):145–152, 2013), inserted
within nanostructures, as a method for biocomputation and molecular concentration.
These results include extensive myosin driven concentration of actin filaments on
a miniaturized detector, of relevance for use of molecular-motors in a diagnostics
platform. Also, we discuss the local enhancement of the fluorescence signal of
filaments, relevant for use in a biocomputation device where tracking of potentially
thousands of motile objects is of primary significance. (Less)
Abstract

The interaction of self-propelled biological molecular-motors and cytoskeletal filaments holds relevance for a variety of applications such as biosensing, drug screening, diagnostics and biocomputation. The use of these systems for lab-on-a-chip biotechnology applications shows potential for replacement of microfluidic flow by active, molecular-motor driven transport of filaments. The ability to control, confine and detect motile objects in such a system is possible by development of nanostructured surfaces for on-chip applications and fundamental studies of molecular-motors. Here we describe the localized detection (Lard et al., Sci Rep 3:1092, 2013) and fast transport of actin filaments by myosin molecular-motors (Lard et al., Biosens... (More)

The interaction of self-propelled biological molecular-motors and cytoskeletal filaments holds relevance for a variety of applications such as biosensing, drug screening, diagnostics and biocomputation. The use of these systems for lab-on-a-chip biotechnology applications shows potential for replacement of microfluidic flow by active, molecular-motor driven transport of filaments. The ability to control, confine and detect motile objects in such a system is possible by development of nanostructured surfaces for on-chip applications and fundamental studies of molecular-motors. Here we describe the localized detection (Lard et al., Sci Rep 3:1092, 2013) and fast transport of actin filaments by myosin molecular-motors (Lard et al., Biosens Biolectron 48(0):145–152, 2013), inserted within nanostructures, as a method for biocomputation and molecular concentration. These results include extensive myosin driven concentration of actin filaments on a miniaturized detector, of relevance for use of molecular-motors in a diagnostics platform. Also, we discuss the local enhancement of the fluorescence signal of filaments, relevant for use in a biocomputation device where tracking of potentially thousands of motile objects is of primary significance.

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organization
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Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
pages
1 pages
conference name
NATO Advanced Study Institute on Nano-Structures for Optics and Photonics: Optical Strategies for Enhancing Sensing, Imaging, Communication, and Energy Conversion
external identifiers
  • scopus:84921667061
DOI
10.1007/978-94-017-9133-5_28
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bb3ebf22-8427-4973-bd38-c7278f405bfb
date added to LUP
2016-04-12 12:25:00
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:27:49
@misc{bb3ebf22-8427-4973-bd38-c7278f405bfb,
  abstract     = {<p>The interaction of self-propelled biological molecular-motors and cytoskeletal filaments holds relevance for a variety of applications such as biosensing, drug screening, diagnostics and biocomputation. The use of these systems for lab-on-a-chip biotechnology applications shows potential for replacement of microfluidic flow by active, molecular-motor driven transport of filaments. The ability to control, confine and detect motile objects in such a system is possible by development of nanostructured surfaces for on-chip applications and fundamental studies of molecular-motors. Here we describe the localized detection (Lard et al., Sci Rep 3:1092, 2013) and fast transport of actin filaments by myosin molecular-motors (Lard et al., Biosens Biolectron 48(0):145–152, 2013), inserted within nanostructures, as a method for biocomputation and molecular concentration. These results include extensive myosin driven concentration of actin filaments on a miniaturized detector, of relevance for use of molecular-motors in a diagnostics platform. Also, we discuss the local enhancement of the fluorescence signal of filaments, relevant for use in a biocomputation device where tracking of potentially thousands of motile objects is of primary significance.</p>},
  author       = {Lard, Mercy and Ten Siethoff, L. and Kumar, S. and Persson, M. and te Kronnie, G. and Månsson, A. and Linke, H.},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {459--459},
  title        = {Nano-structuring for molecular motor control},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9133-5_28},
  year         = {2015},
}