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Aesthetic Flexibility in the Management of Visual Product Branding

Andersson, Torbjörn and Warell, Anders LU (2015) In Procedia Manufacturing 3. p.2191-2198
Abstract

This paper will investigate the strategic design decision-making of an in-house designer in a company with a large product portfolio, with respect to how designers plan for future visual alterations of the product. In-house designers have to think strategically about the creation of recognition and differentiation through design because they influence the company's overall strategies. Therefore, while balancing aesthetic and semiotic qualities of the product, designers have to consider current as well as future needs for recognition and product differentiation. The ability to do so is affected by cost and brand positioning strategy. An exploratory study was setup to investigate what design strategies could be found in an industrial... (More)

This paper will investigate the strategic design decision-making of an in-house designer in a company with a large product portfolio, with respect to how designers plan for future visual alterations of the product. In-house designers have to think strategically about the creation of recognition and differentiation through design because they influence the company's overall strategies. Therefore, while balancing aesthetic and semiotic qualities of the product, designers have to consider current as well as future needs for recognition and product differentiation. The ability to do so is affected by cost and brand positioning strategy. An exploratory study was setup to investigate what design strategies could be found in an industrial design team employed by a company. The study exposed how in-house designers could strategically incorporate aesthetic flexibility in product parts in order to create opportunities for faster facelifts or redesigns. The importance of managing carry-over details in larger product portfolios was also discovered. To carry over parts from different products is an important way for a company to save money, development time and at the same time increase brand recognition through repetition. Carry-over can be an aid to enhance visual recognition, but it can also be a hindrance when the designer needs to create differencing design values. Most products have a lifespan before they need to be updated or redesigned, which depends on the competition in a product segment. This makes it extra important for designers to have an understanding of when to incorporate carry-over details and when not to. A model was created to describe how carry-over details, design cues and aesthetic flexibility could be managed in a product portfolio. The model is based on Rune Monö’s works and brand management literature, with an emphasis on the brand positioning framework of Point of Difference, Point of Parity and brand extension by Keller et al.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Brand extension, Carry-over, In-house designers, Product management, Strategic Design Decisions, Visual recognition
in
Procedia Manufacturing
volume
3
pages
8 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85009998064
DOI
10.1016/j.promfg.2015.07.360
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bc6bbbf0-58c6-4a8d-b20b-558c02aff0cc
date added to LUP
2017-02-17 07:06:19
date last changed
2017-02-17 07:06:19
@article{bc6bbbf0-58c6-4a8d-b20b-558c02aff0cc,
  abstract     = {<p>This paper will investigate the strategic design decision-making of an in-house designer in a company with a large product portfolio, with respect to how designers plan for future visual alterations of the product. In-house designers have to think strategically about the creation of recognition and differentiation through design because they influence the company's overall strategies. Therefore, while balancing aesthetic and semiotic qualities of the product, designers have to consider current as well as future needs for recognition and product differentiation. The ability to do so is affected by cost and brand positioning strategy. An exploratory study was setup to investigate what design strategies could be found in an industrial design team employed by a company. The study exposed how in-house designers could strategically incorporate aesthetic flexibility in product parts in order to create opportunities for faster facelifts or redesigns. The importance of managing carry-over details in larger product portfolios was also discovered. To carry over parts from different products is an important way for a company to save money, development time and at the same time increase brand recognition through repetition. Carry-over can be an aid to enhance visual recognition, but it can also be a hindrance when the designer needs to create differencing design values. Most products have a lifespan before they need to be updated or redesigned, which depends on the competition in a product segment. This makes it extra important for designers to have an understanding of when to incorporate carry-over details and when not to. A model was created to describe how carry-over details, design cues and aesthetic flexibility could be managed in a product portfolio. The model is based on Rune Monö’s works and brand management literature, with an emphasis on the brand positioning framework of Point of Difference, Point of Parity and brand extension by Keller et al.</p>},
  author       = {Andersson, Torbjörn and Warell, Anders},
  keyword      = {Brand extension,Carry-over,In-house designers,Product management,Strategic Design Decisions,Visual recognition},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {2191--2198},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Procedia Manufacturing},
  title        = {Aesthetic Flexibility in the Management of Visual Product Branding},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.promfg.2015.07.360},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2015},
}