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Regional differences in air velocity of microclimate inside clothing and bellows effect

Kim, Siyeon LU ; Kim, Do-Hee; Kuklane, Kalev LU and Lee, Joo-Young (2017) 12th Joint International Conference CLOTECH' 2017 p.285-296
Abstract
Despite of a crucial role of microclimate inside clothing in thermal comfort, air velocity inside clothing has been hardly reported, ever since Lewis et al (1969) demonstrated that air velocity of the still air layer on the naked human body was 0.25 m/s using colour schlieren cinephotography. This study was aimed to investigate the air velocity of microenvironment inside clothing and the bellows effects using an anemometer.
Four male subjects participated in this study (age 24±5 yrs; height 178±5 cm; weight 76±7 kg). Each trial began with a 10 min sitting on a chair and walking on a treadmill at 5.0 km/h with 3% slope for 30 min thereafter at 25oC and 40%RH. Experimental clothing consisted of semi-impermeable long-sleeved t-shirts... (More)
Despite of a crucial role of microclimate inside clothing in thermal comfort, air velocity inside clothing has been hardly reported, ever since Lewis et al (1969) demonstrated that air velocity of the still air layer on the naked human body was 0.25 m/s using colour schlieren cinephotography. This study was aimed to investigate the air velocity of microenvironment inside clothing and the bellows effects using an anemometer.
Four male subjects participated in this study (age 24±5 yrs; height 178±5 cm; weight 76±7 kg). Each trial began with a 10 min sitting on a chair and walking on a treadmill at 5.0 km/h with 3% slope for 30 min thereafter at 25oC and 40%RH. Experimental clothing consisted of semi-impermeable long-sleeved t-shirts (polyester with polyurethane/silver coating), sportswear pants (cotton 100%). Air velocity was measured on the chest, scapula, and side by an anemometer (6244 System, KANOMAX, Japan) with 0.01m/s of measuring resolution. One-way ANOVA and repeated measures ANOVA were tested to investigate the differences of state and region. Post-hoc test was conducted by LSD and the critical p-value was set at p < 0.1. All values were represented as mean±SD.
The results showed that the air velocity inside clothing was 0.09±0.04 m/s, 0.13±0.04 m/s, and 0.07±0.03 m/s on the chest, the scapula and the side, respectively in a sitting position. When subjects started to walk, it dramatically increased (p=0.025), and the greatest change caused by movement was presented in the side (0.51±0.32 m/s) followed by the chest (0.31±0.16 m/s) and the scapula (0.19±0.12 m/s). Air velocity in a static state and the change on the side were significantly greater than that on the scapula (p = 0.066, p = 0.054 respectively). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
host publication
Innovations in protective and e-textiles in balance with comfort and ecology
editor
Frydrych, Iwona; Bartkowiak, Grazyna; Pawlova, Maria; ; and
pages
12 pages
publisher
Lodz University of Technology
conference name
12th Joint International Conference CLOTECH' 2017
conference location
Lodz, Poland
conference dates
2017-10-11 - 2017-10-14
ISBN
978-83-7283-855-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bce18f11-c911-4026-859c-557d097e1b9e
date added to LUP
2017-10-30 23:04:49
date last changed
2018-11-21 21:35:44
@inproceedings{bce18f11-c911-4026-859c-557d097e1b9e,
  abstract     = {Despite of a crucial role of microclimate inside clothing in thermal comfort, air velocity inside clothing has been hardly reported, ever since Lewis et al (1969) demonstrated that air velocity of the still air layer on the naked human body was 0.25 m/s using colour schlieren cinephotography. This study was aimed to investigate the air velocity of microenvironment inside clothing and the bellows effects using an anemometer.<br>
Four male subjects participated in this study (age 24±5 yrs; height 178±5 cm; weight 76±7 kg). Each trial began with a 10 min sitting on a chair and walking on a treadmill at 5.0 km/h with 3% slope for 30 min thereafter at 25oC and 40%RH. Experimental clothing consisted of semi-impermeable long-sleeved t-shirts (polyester with polyurethane/silver coating), sportswear pants (cotton 100%). Air velocity was measured on the chest, scapula, and side by an anemometer (6244 System, KANOMAX, Japan) with 0.01m/s of measuring resolution. One-way ANOVA and repeated measures ANOVA were tested to investigate the differences of state and region. Post-hoc test was conducted by LSD and the critical p-value was set at p &lt; 0.1. All values were represented as mean±SD. <br>
The results showed that the air velocity inside clothing was 0.09±0.04 m/s, 0.13±0.04 m/s, and 0.07±0.03 m/s on the chest, the scapula and the side, respectively in a sitting position. When subjects started to walk, it dramatically increased (p=0.025), and the greatest change caused by movement was presented in the side (0.51±0.32 m/s) followed by the chest (0.31±0.16 m/s) and the scapula (0.19±0.12 m/s). Air velocity in a static state and the change on the side were significantly greater than that on the scapula (p = 0.066, p = 0.054 respectively).},
  author       = {Kim, Siyeon and Kim, Do-Hee and Kuklane, Kalev and Lee, Joo-Young},
  editor       = {Frydrych, Iwona and Bartkowiak, Grazyna and Pawlova, Maria},
  isbn         = {978-83-7283-855-1},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Lodz, Poland},
  month        = {10},
  pages        = {285--296},
  publisher    = {Lodz University of Technology},
  title        = {Regional differences in air velocity of microclimate inside clothing and bellows effect},
  year         = {2017},
}