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Evaluation of smooth pursuit and voluntary saccades in nitrous oxide-induced narcosis

Magnusson, Måns LU ; Padoan, S and Ornhagen, H (1989) In Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine 60(10 Pt 1). p.82-977
Abstract

The effect of inhaling nitrous oxide on pursuit eye movements (PEM) and voluntary saccades was studied in nine healthy subjects. Eye movements were recorded before, during, and 10 min after exposure for 15 min to normoxic mixtures of 14%, 21%, and 28% nitrous oxide. At all concentrations, there was a significant decrease in gain of PEM at a target velocity of 60 degrees/s, the decrease being of comparable magnitude at concentrations of 14% and 21%. By 10 min after exposure to nitrous oxide, the gain of PEM had recovered to pre-test values. There was also a highly significant decrease in the peak velocity of voluntary saccades at all concentrations of nitrous oxide; the decrease was more pronounced at the higher concentrations, and the... (More)

The effect of inhaling nitrous oxide on pursuit eye movements (PEM) and voluntary saccades was studied in nine healthy subjects. Eye movements were recorded before, during, and 10 min after exposure for 15 min to normoxic mixtures of 14%, 21%, and 28% nitrous oxide. At all concentrations, there was a significant decrease in gain of PEM at a target velocity of 60 degrees/s, the decrease being of comparable magnitude at concentrations of 14% and 21%. By 10 min after exposure to nitrous oxide, the gain of PEM had recovered to pre-test values. There was also a highly significant decrease in the peak velocity of voluntary saccades at all concentrations of nitrous oxide; the decrease was more pronounced at the higher concentrations, and the existence of a dose-dependent relationship is suspected. Exposure to 21% nitrous oxide for only 2 min was enough to induce significant reduction in peak velocity of voluntary saccades. By 10 min after exposure to nitrous oxide, the peak velocity of voluntary saccades had recovered but had not reached pre-test values. The findings suggest that both PEM and voluntary saccades decrease with reduced alertness in mild narcosis. Moreover, as the effects of nitrous oxide are considered typical of inert gases in general, our findings suggest that voluntary eye movements may also be a suitable variable for use in assessing the effects of inert gas narcosis.

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author
publishing date
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Adult, Eye Movements, Female, Humans, Male, Nitrous Oxide, Pursuit, Smooth, Saccades, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine
volume
60
issue
10 Pt 1
pages
82 - 977
publisher
Aerospace Medical Association
external identifiers
  • scopus:0024467890
ISSN
0095-6562
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
bef03de0-77ec-4323-8cf5-490d10d51a72
date added to LUP
2017-05-03 12:54:10
date last changed
2017-05-16 10:11:44
@article{bef03de0-77ec-4323-8cf5-490d10d51a72,
  abstract     = {<p>The effect of inhaling nitrous oxide on pursuit eye movements (PEM) and voluntary saccades was studied in nine healthy subjects. Eye movements were recorded before, during, and 10 min after exposure for 15 min to normoxic mixtures of 14%, 21%, and 28% nitrous oxide. At all concentrations, there was a significant decrease in gain of PEM at a target velocity of 60 degrees/s, the decrease being of comparable magnitude at concentrations of 14% and 21%. By 10 min after exposure to nitrous oxide, the gain of PEM had recovered to pre-test values. There was also a highly significant decrease in the peak velocity of voluntary saccades at all concentrations of nitrous oxide; the decrease was more pronounced at the higher concentrations, and the existence of a dose-dependent relationship is suspected. Exposure to 21% nitrous oxide for only 2 min was enough to induce significant reduction in peak velocity of voluntary saccades. By 10 min after exposure to nitrous oxide, the peak velocity of voluntary saccades had recovered but had not reached pre-test values. The findings suggest that both PEM and voluntary saccades decrease with reduced alertness in mild narcosis. Moreover, as the effects of nitrous oxide are considered typical of inert gases in general, our findings suggest that voluntary eye movements may also be a suitable variable for use in assessing the effects of inert gas narcosis.</p>},
  author       = {Magnusson, Måns and Padoan, S and Ornhagen, H},
  issn         = {0095-6562},
  keyword      = {Adult,Eye Movements,Female,Humans,Male,Nitrous Oxide,Pursuit, Smooth,Saccades,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10 Pt 1},
  pages        = {82--977},
  publisher    = {Aerospace Medical Association},
  series       = {Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine},
  title        = {Evaluation of smooth pursuit and voluntary saccades in nitrous oxide-induced narcosis},
  volume       = {60},
  year         = {1989},
}