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Is the effect of body mass index on hypertension modified by the elevation? A cross-sectional study of rural areas in Japan

Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Shiotani, Yoshiya; Takeda, Miwako; Abe, Takafumi; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Nabika, Toru (2017) In International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14(9).
Abstract

Obesity is an established independent risk factor for developing hypertension. A recent study showed that the effect of obesity on hypertension varies by the elevation of the residence area. Thus, we hypothesized that the interaction effect of body mass index (BMI) and elevation has a significant association with hypertension. The first aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine whether BMI was associated with hypertension, after adjustment for covariates. The second aim was to examine whether the interaction term between BMI and elevation was associated with hypertension, after adjustment for covariates. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study conducted in a rural area of Japan in 2016. After excluding participants with... (More)

Obesity is an established independent risk factor for developing hypertension. A recent study showed that the effect of obesity on hypertension varies by the elevation of the residence area. Thus, we hypothesized that the interaction effect of body mass index (BMI) and elevation has a significant association with hypertension. The first aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine whether BMI was associated with hypertension, after adjustment for covariates. The second aim was to examine whether the interaction term between BMI and elevation was associated with hypertension, after adjustment for covariates. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study conducted in a rural area of Japan in 2016. After excluding participants with missing data (n = 2), data from 729 participants were analyzed. We found that BMI was significantly associated with hypertension. In addition, the interaction term between BMI and elevation had a significant association with hypertension. The findings of the present study support the recent evidence that high BMI is an independent risk factor for hypertension, but its effect varies by elevation. Thus, context-specific interventions could be an effective approach to prevent hypertension in this area.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Body mass index, Cross-sectional study, Elevation, Hypertension, Rural area
in
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
volume
14
issue
9
publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
external identifiers
  • scopus:85029147396
  • pmid:28880204
  • wos:000411574400074
ISSN
1661-7827
DOI
10.3390/ijerph14091022
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bf03fc60-7d1b-4442-8cca-351e594aa4e0
date added to LUP
2017-10-09 11:30:16
date last changed
2018-01-16 13:21:49
@article{bf03fc60-7d1b-4442-8cca-351e594aa4e0,
  abstract     = {<p>Obesity is an established independent risk factor for developing hypertension. A recent study showed that the effect of obesity on hypertension varies by the elevation of the residence area. Thus, we hypothesized that the interaction effect of body mass index (BMI) and elevation has a significant association with hypertension. The first aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine whether BMI was associated with hypertension, after adjustment for covariates. The second aim was to examine whether the interaction term between BMI and elevation was associated with hypertension, after adjustment for covariates. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study conducted in a rural area of Japan in 2016. After excluding participants with missing data (n = 2), data from 729 participants were analyzed. We found that BMI was significantly associated with hypertension. In addition, the interaction term between BMI and elevation had a significant association with hypertension. The findings of the present study support the recent evidence that high BMI is an independent risk factor for hypertension, but its effect varies by elevation. Thus, context-specific interventions could be an effective approach to prevent hypertension in this area.</p>},
  articleno    = {1022},
  author       = {Hamano, Tsuyoshi and Shiotani, Yoshiya and Takeda, Miwako and Abe, Takafumi and Sundquist, Kristina and Nabika, Toru},
  issn         = {1661-7827},
  keyword      = {Body mass index,Cross-sectional study,Elevation,Hypertension,Rural area},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {9},
  publisher    = {Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)},
  series       = {International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health},
  title        = {Is the effect of body mass index on hypertension modified by the elevation? A cross-sectional study of rural areas in Japan},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091022},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2017},
}