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Polysomnographic measures of sleep in cocaine dependence and alcohol dependence : Implications for age-related loss of slow wave, stage 3 sleep

Irwin, Michael R; Bjurstrom, Martin F LU and Olmstead, Richard (2016) In Addiction 111(6). p.92-1084
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Sleep disturbance is a prominent complaint in cocaine and alcohol dependence. This controlled study evaluated differences of polysomnographic (PSG) sleep in cocaine- and alcohol-dependent subjects, and examined whether substance dependence interacts with age to alter slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparison.

SETTING: Los Angeles and San Diego, CA, USA.

PARTICIPANTS: Abstinent cocaine-dependent subjects (n = 32), abstinent alcohol-dependent subjects (n = 73) and controls (n = 108); mean age 40.3 years recruited 2005-12.

MEASUREMENTS: PSG measures of sleep continuity and sleep architecture primary outcomes of Stage 3 sleep and REM sleep. Covariates... (More)

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Sleep disturbance is a prominent complaint in cocaine and alcohol dependence. This controlled study evaluated differences of polysomnographic (PSG) sleep in cocaine- and alcohol-dependent subjects, and examined whether substance dependence interacts with age to alter slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparison.

SETTING: Los Angeles and San Diego, CA, USA.

PARTICIPANTS: Abstinent cocaine-dependent subjects (n = 32), abstinent alcohol-dependent subjects (n = 73) and controls (n = 108); mean age 40.3 years recruited 2005-12.

MEASUREMENTS: PSG measures of sleep continuity and sleep architecture primary outcomes of Stage 3 sleep and REM sleep. Covariates included age, ethnicity, education, smoking, body mass index and depressive symptoms.

FINDINGS: Compared with controls, both groups of substance dependent subjects showed loss of Stage 3 sleep (P < 0.001). A substance dependence × age interaction was found in which both cocaine- and alcohol-dependent groups showed loss of Stage 3 sleep at an earlier age than controls (P < 0.05 for all), and cocaine-dependent subjects showed loss of Stage 3 sleep at an earlier age than alcoholics (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, REM sleep was increased in both substance-dependent groups (P < 0.001), and cocaine and alcohol dependence were associated with earlier age-related increase in REM sleep (P < 0.05 for all).

CONCLUSIONS: Cocaine and alcohol dependence appear to be associated with marked disturbances of sleep architecture, including increased rapid eye movement sleep and accelerated age-related loss of slow wave, Stage 3 sleep.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Adult, Age Factors, Aging, Alcoholism, Cocaine-Related Disorders, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polysomnography, Sleep, Sleep Wake Disorders, Journal Article
in
Addiction
volume
111
issue
6
pages
92 - 1084
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:84959418902
ISSN
1360-0443
DOI
10.1111/add.13300
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
bf16ccf9-b264-4c33-8839-a590a8313c2b
date added to LUP
2018-04-26 11:08:34
date last changed
2018-05-13 04:40:00
@article{bf16ccf9-b264-4c33-8839-a590a8313c2b,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Sleep disturbance is a prominent complaint in cocaine and alcohol dependence. This controlled study evaluated differences of polysomnographic (PSG) sleep in cocaine- and alcohol-dependent subjects, and examined whether substance dependence interacts with age to alter slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep.</p><p>DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparison.</p><p>SETTING: Los Angeles and San Diego, CA, USA.</p><p>PARTICIPANTS: Abstinent cocaine-dependent subjects (n = 32), abstinent alcohol-dependent subjects (n = 73) and controls (n = 108); mean age 40.3 years recruited 2005-12.</p><p>MEASUREMENTS: PSG measures of sleep continuity and sleep architecture primary outcomes of Stage 3 sleep and REM sleep. Covariates included age, ethnicity, education, smoking, body mass index and depressive symptoms.</p><p>FINDINGS: Compared with controls, both groups of substance dependent subjects showed loss of Stage 3 sleep (P &lt; 0.001). A substance dependence × age interaction was found in which both cocaine- and alcohol-dependent groups showed loss of Stage 3 sleep at an earlier age than controls (P &lt; 0.05 for all), and cocaine-dependent subjects showed loss of Stage 3 sleep at an earlier age than alcoholics (P &lt; 0.05). Compared with controls, REM sleep was increased in both substance-dependent groups (P &lt; 0.001), and cocaine and alcohol dependence were associated with earlier age-related increase in REM sleep (P &lt; 0.05 for all).</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Cocaine and alcohol dependence appear to be associated with marked disturbances of sleep architecture, including increased rapid eye movement sleep and accelerated age-related loss of slow wave, Stage 3 sleep.</p>},
  author       = {Irwin, Michael R and Bjurstrom, Martin F and Olmstead, Richard},
  issn         = {1360-0443},
  keyword      = {Adult,Age Factors,Aging,Alcoholism,Cocaine-Related Disorders,Cross-Sectional Studies,Female,Humans,Male,Middle Aged,Polysomnography,Sleep,Sleep Wake Disorders,Journal Article},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {92--1084},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Addiction},
  title        = {Polysomnographic measures of sleep in cocaine dependence and alcohol dependence : Implications for age-related loss of slow wave, stage 3 sleep},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/add.13300},
  volume       = {111},
  year         = {2016},
}