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A cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging study of factors influencing growth plate closure in adolescents and young adults

Kvist, Ola ; Luiza Dallora, Ana ; Nilsson, Ola ; Anderberg, Peter LU ; Sanmartin Berglund, Johan ; Flodmark, Carl Erik LU and Diaz, Sandra LU (2021) In Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics 110(4). p.1249-1256
Abstract

Aim: To assess growth plate fusion by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluate the correlation with sex, age, pubertal development, physical activity and BMI. Methods: Wrist, knee and ankle of 958 healthy subjects aged 14.0-21.5 years old were examined using MRI and graded by two radiologists. Correlations of growth plate fusion score with age, pubertal development, physical activity and BMI were assessed. Results: Complete growth plate fusion occurred in 75%, 85%, 97%, 98%, 98% and 90%, 97%, 95%, 97%, 98% (radius, femur, proximal- and distal tibia and calcaneus) in 17-year-old females and 19-year-old males, respectively. Complete fusion occurs approximately 2 years earlier in girls than in boys. Pubertal development correlated... (More)

Aim: To assess growth plate fusion by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluate the correlation with sex, age, pubertal development, physical activity and BMI. Methods: Wrist, knee and ankle of 958 healthy subjects aged 14.0-21.5 years old were examined using MRI and graded by two radiologists. Correlations of growth plate fusion score with age, pubertal development, physical activity and BMI were assessed. Results: Complete growth plate fusion occurred in 75%, 85%, 97%, 98%, 98% and 90%, 97%, 95%, 97%, 98% (radius, femur, proximal- and distal tibia and calcaneus) in 17-year-old females and 19-year-old males, respectively. Complete fusion occurs approximately 2 years earlier in girls than in boys. Pubertal development correlated with growth plate fusion score (ρ = 0.514-0.598 for the different growth plate sites) but regular physical activity did not. BMI also correlated with growth plate fusion (ρ = 0.186-0.384). Stratified logistic regression showed increased odds ratio (OR F: 2.65-8.71; M: 1.71-4.03) for growth plate fusion of obese or overweight subects versus normal-weight subjects. Inter-observer agreement was high (Κ = 0.87-0.94). Conclusion: Growth plate fusion can be assessed by MRI; occurs in an ascending order, from the foot to the wrist; and is significantly influenced by sex, pubertal development and BMI, but not by physical activity.

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author
; ; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
growth plate, magnetic resonance imaging, maturation process, obesity, puberty
in
Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
volume
110
issue
4
pages
1249 - 1256
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85094635288
  • pmid:33047349
ISSN
0803-5253
DOI
10.1111/apa.15617
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bfd43493-4a48-403f-91c8-b3032878850d
date added to LUP
2020-11-17 13:10:31
date last changed
2021-06-09 01:17:43
@article{bfd43493-4a48-403f-91c8-b3032878850d,
  abstract     = {<p>Aim: To assess growth plate fusion by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluate the correlation with sex, age, pubertal development, physical activity and BMI. Methods: Wrist, knee and ankle of 958 healthy subjects aged 14.0-21.5 years old were examined using MRI and graded by two radiologists. Correlations of growth plate fusion score with age, pubertal development, physical activity and BMI were assessed. Results: Complete growth plate fusion occurred in 75%, 85%, 97%, 98%, 98% and 90%, 97%, 95%, 97%, 98% (radius, femur, proximal- and distal tibia and calcaneus) in 17-year-old females and 19-year-old males, respectively. Complete fusion occurs approximately 2 years earlier in girls than in boys. Pubertal development correlated with growth plate fusion score (ρ = 0.514-0.598 for the different growth plate sites) but regular physical activity did not. BMI also correlated with growth plate fusion (ρ = 0.186-0.384). Stratified logistic regression showed increased odds ratio (OR F: 2.65-8.71; M: 1.71-4.03) for growth plate fusion of obese or overweight subects versus normal-weight subjects. Inter-observer agreement was high (Κ = 0.87-0.94). Conclusion: Growth plate fusion can be assessed by MRI; occurs in an ascending order, from the foot to the wrist; and is significantly influenced by sex, pubertal development and BMI, but not by physical activity.</p>},
  author       = {Kvist, Ola and Luiza Dallora, Ana and Nilsson, Ola and Anderberg, Peter and Sanmartin Berglund, Johan and Flodmark, Carl Erik and Diaz, Sandra},
  issn         = {0803-5253},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1249--1256},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics},
  title        = {A cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging study of factors influencing growth plate closure in adolescents and young adults},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.15617},
  doi          = {10.1111/apa.15617},
  volume       = {110},
  year         = {2021},
}