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Who controls carbon emissions from transport and who cares? : Investigating the monitoring of environmental sustainability from a logistics service provider’s perspective

Nilsson, Fredrik LU ; Sternberg, Henrik LU and Klaas-Wissing, Thorsten (2017) In International Journal of Logistics Management 28(3). p.798-820
Abstract
Purpose


The purpose of this paper is to explore the environmental impact of logistics service provider (LSP) activities in the light of customer priorities and the fragmentation of the road haulage industry in Europe. It also explores the extent to which LSPs can actually monitor the environmental impact of logistics activities in the supply chain (SC).




Design/methodology/approach


The research is based on a narrative literature review, an interview study, a case survey and three in-depth case studies. A framework on sustainability challenges in SCs, derived from the literature, is used to structure and analyse the findings.




Findings


Despite the... (More)
Purpose


The purpose of this paper is to explore the environmental impact of logistics service provider (LSP) activities in the light of customer priorities and the fragmentation of the road haulage industry in Europe. It also explores the extent to which LSPs can actually monitor the environmental impact of logistics activities in the supply chain (SC).




Design/methodology/approach


The research is based on a narrative literature review, an interview study, a case survey and three in-depth case studies. A framework on sustainability challenges in SCs, derived from the literature, is used to structure and analyse the findings.




Findings


Despite the ambitious environmental schemes communicated by several LSPs, they show little interest in, and exert little control over, the actual emissions generated from their transport operations. It is clear from the results that any real concern from customers for environmental solutions which negatively influence the cost and time requirements of logistics services is not yet a reality.




Research limitations/implications


This paper implies that LSP sustainability cannot be investigated in isolation if a company does not manage its proprietary resources (like owning trucks and employing drivers), but rather engage subcontractors.




Practical implications


Environmental policies among different LSPs appear to be similar as policies, but differ in practice. This variation of practices emphasises the importance of follow-up control by environmentally aware buyers of logistics services.




Originality/value


This paper represents a novel approach as to how LSP environmental policies should be viewed. It highlights the concrete need for action to achieve the environmental targets of 2020 and 2050 for carbon emissions from road transportation.
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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Supply chain management, Logistics service provider, Greenwash, Haulier, Transport efficiency
in
International Journal of Logistics Management
volume
28
issue
3
pages
22 pages
publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
external identifiers
  • scopus:85027685771
  • wos:000407927300006
ISSN
0957-4093
DOI
10.1108/IJLM-11-2015-0197
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c151ba19-808f-46e2-8932-90bf96d80139
date added to LUP
2017-08-11 00:27:07
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:41:24
@article{c151ba19-808f-46e2-8932-90bf96d80139,
  abstract     = {Purpose<br/><br/><br/>The purpose of this paper is to explore the environmental impact of logistics service provider (LSP) activities in the light of customer priorities and the fragmentation of the road haulage industry in Europe. It also explores the extent to which LSPs can actually monitor the environmental impact of logistics activities in the supply chain (SC).<br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>Design/methodology/approach<br/><br/><br/>The research is based on a narrative literature review, an interview study, a case survey and three in-depth case studies. A framework on sustainability challenges in SCs, derived from the literature, is used to structure and analyse the findings.<br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings<br/><br/><br/>Despite the ambitious environmental schemes communicated by several LSPs, they show little interest in, and exert little control over, the actual emissions generated from their transport operations. It is clear from the results that any real concern from customers for environmental solutions which negatively influence the cost and time requirements of logistics services is not yet a reality.<br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>Research limitations/implications<br/><br/><br/>This paper implies that LSP sustainability cannot be investigated in isolation if a company does not manage its proprietary resources (like owning trucks and employing drivers), but rather engage subcontractors.<br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>Practical implications<br/><br/><br/>Environmental policies among different LSPs appear to be similar as policies, but differ in practice. This variation of practices emphasises the importance of follow-up control by environmentally aware buyers of logistics services.<br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>Originality/value<br/><br/><br/>This paper represents a novel approach as to how LSP environmental policies should be viewed. It highlights the concrete need for action to achieve the environmental targets of 2020 and 2050 for carbon emissions from road transportation.<br/>},
  author       = {Nilsson, Fredrik and Sternberg, Henrik and Klaas-Wissing, Thorsten},
  issn         = {0957-4093},
  keyword      = {Supply chain management, Logistics service provider,Greenwash,Haulier, Transport efficiency},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {798--820},
  publisher    = {Emerald Group Publishing Limited},
  series       = {International Journal of Logistics Management},
  title        = {Who controls carbon emissions from transport and who cares? : Investigating the monitoring of environmental sustainability from a logistics service provider’s perspective},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJLM-11-2015-0197},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2017},
}