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Low level of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli among Swedish nursing home residents

Olofsson, Magnus; Toepfer, Michael; Ostgren, Carl Johan; Midlöv, Patrik LU ; Matussek, Andreas; Lindgren, Per-Eric and Mölstad, Sigvard LU (2013) In Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 45(2). p.117-123
Abstract
Background: Screening for bacterial colonization and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among a defined population could aid in the identification of at-risk populations and provide targets for antibiotic stewardship and infection control programmes. Methods: Two hundred and sixty-eight participants at 11 Swedish nursing homes underwent serial screening for colonization with Escherichia coli between March 2008 and September 2010. Seventy-two of the 268 participants (27%) were male. The median age was 85 y. Samples were collected from urine, the rectal mucosa, the groin, and active skin lesions. Results: Two hundred and nine of 268 participants (78%) were colonized with E. coli at any body site/fluid. The specific colonization rates were 81%... (More)
Background: Screening for bacterial colonization and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among a defined population could aid in the identification of at-risk populations and provide targets for antibiotic stewardship and infection control programmes. Methods: Two hundred and sixty-eight participants at 11 Swedish nursing homes underwent serial screening for colonization with Escherichia coli between March 2008 and September 2010. Seventy-two of the 268 participants (27%) were male. The median age was 85 y. Samples were collected from urine, the rectal mucosa, the groin, and active skin lesions. Results: Two hundred and nine of 268 participants (78%) were colonized with E. coli at any body site/fluid. The specific colonization rates were 81% (rectum), 48% (urine), 30% (groin), 59% (unknown), and 13% (skin lesion). An antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolate was identified in 18% of all participants regardless of colonization status; all together, 87 resistant isolates were detected. Only 1 participant carried isolates with resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (cefotaxime and ceftazidime). Conclusions: The presence of resistance was generally low, and the greater part of the resistant cases was connected with 3 common antibiotics: ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and ciprofloxacin. In spite of generally increasing resistance against third-generation cephalosporins in E. coli in Sweden, this study does not implicate residence at a Swedish nursing home as a risk factor for the acquisition of expressed cephalosporin resistance. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Mass screening, colonization, nursing homes, drug resistance, bacterial, Escherichia coli
in
Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases
volume
45
issue
2
pages
117 - 123
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • wos:000313677200006
  • scopus:84872332120
ISSN
1651-1980
DOI
10.3109/00365548.2012.717232
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c1788180-3d6c-4b0d-a8a0-937811617a3d (old id 3470513)
date added to LUP
2013-03-01 07:45:26
date last changed
2019-01-06 08:39:53
@article{c1788180-3d6c-4b0d-a8a0-937811617a3d,
  abstract     = {Background: Screening for bacterial colonization and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among a defined population could aid in the identification of at-risk populations and provide targets for antibiotic stewardship and infection control programmes. Methods: Two hundred and sixty-eight participants at 11 Swedish nursing homes underwent serial screening for colonization with Escherichia coli between March 2008 and September 2010. Seventy-two of the 268 participants (27%) were male. The median age was 85 y. Samples were collected from urine, the rectal mucosa, the groin, and active skin lesions. Results: Two hundred and nine of 268 participants (78%) were colonized with E. coli at any body site/fluid. The specific colonization rates were 81% (rectum), 48% (urine), 30% (groin), 59% (unknown), and 13% (skin lesion). An antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolate was identified in 18% of all participants regardless of colonization status; all together, 87 resistant isolates were detected. Only 1 participant carried isolates with resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (cefotaxime and ceftazidime). Conclusions: The presence of resistance was generally low, and the greater part of the resistant cases was connected with 3 common antibiotics: ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and ciprofloxacin. In spite of generally increasing resistance against third-generation cephalosporins in E. coli in Sweden, this study does not implicate residence at a Swedish nursing home as a risk factor for the acquisition of expressed cephalosporin resistance.},
  author       = {Olofsson, Magnus and Toepfer, Michael and Ostgren, Carl Johan and Midlöv, Patrik and Matussek, Andreas and Lindgren, Per-Eric and Mölstad, Sigvard},
  issn         = {1651-1980},
  keyword      = {Mass screening,colonization,nursing homes,drug resistance,bacterial,Escherichia coli},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {117--123},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Low level of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli among Swedish nursing home residents},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365548.2012.717232},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2013},
}