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Microbial Regulation of Enteric Eosinophils and Its Impact on Tissue Remodeling and Th2 Immunity

Jiménez-Saiz, Rodrigo ; Anipindi, Varun C. ; Galipeau, Heather ; Ellenbogen, Yosef ; Chaudhary, Roopali ; Koenig, Joshua F. ; Gordon, Melissa E. ; Walker, Tina D. ; Mandur, Talveer S. and Abed, Soumeya , et al. (2020) In Frontiers in Immunology 11.
Abstract

Eosinophils have emerged as multifaceted cells that contribute to tissue homeostasis. However, the impact of the microbiota on their frequency and function at mucosal sites remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of the microbiota in the regulation of enteric eosinophils. We found that small intestinal (SI) eosinophilia was significantly greater in germ-free (GF) mice compared to specific pathogen free (SPF) controls. This was associated with changes in the production of enteric signals that regulate eosinophil attraction and survival, and was fully reversed by complex colonization. Additionally, SI eosinophils of GF mice exhibited more cytoplasmic protrusions and less granule content than SPF controls. Lastly, we generated a... (More)

Eosinophils have emerged as multifaceted cells that contribute to tissue homeostasis. However, the impact of the microbiota on their frequency and function at mucosal sites remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of the microbiota in the regulation of enteric eosinophils. We found that small intestinal (SI) eosinophilia was significantly greater in germ-free (GF) mice compared to specific pathogen free (SPF) controls. This was associated with changes in the production of enteric signals that regulate eosinophil attraction and survival, and was fully reversed by complex colonization. Additionally, SI eosinophils of GF mice exhibited more cytoplasmic protrusions and less granule content than SPF controls. Lastly, we generated a novel strain of eosinophil-deficient GF mice. These mice displayed intestinal fibrosis and were less prone to allergic sensitization as compared to GF controls. Overall, our study demonstrates that commensal microbes regulate intestinal eosinophil frequency and function, which impacts tissue repair and allergic sensitization to food antigens. These data support a critical interplay between the commensal microbiota and intestinal eosinophils in shaping homeostatic, innate, and adaptive immune processes in health and disease.

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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
allergy, eosinophils, germfree, IgE, microbiota, small intestine, tissue remodeling
in
Frontiers in Immunology
volume
11
article number
155
publisher
Frontiers Media S. A.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85080089020
  • pmid:32117293
ISSN
1664-3224
DOI
10.3389/fimmu.2020.00155
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c2af1340-126c-4bfa-a5e4-da9f44672607
date added to LUP
2021-01-13 10:10:15
date last changed
2021-02-17 05:26:21
@article{c2af1340-126c-4bfa-a5e4-da9f44672607,
  abstract     = {<p>Eosinophils have emerged as multifaceted cells that contribute to tissue homeostasis. However, the impact of the microbiota on their frequency and function at mucosal sites remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of the microbiota in the regulation of enteric eosinophils. We found that small intestinal (SI) eosinophilia was significantly greater in germ-free (GF) mice compared to specific pathogen free (SPF) controls. This was associated with changes in the production of enteric signals that regulate eosinophil attraction and survival, and was fully reversed by complex colonization. Additionally, SI eosinophils of GF mice exhibited more cytoplasmic protrusions and less granule content than SPF controls. Lastly, we generated a novel strain of eosinophil-deficient GF mice. These mice displayed intestinal fibrosis and were less prone to allergic sensitization as compared to GF controls. Overall, our study demonstrates that commensal microbes regulate intestinal eosinophil frequency and function, which impacts tissue repair and allergic sensitization to food antigens. These data support a critical interplay between the commensal microbiota and intestinal eosinophils in shaping homeostatic, innate, and adaptive immune processes in health and disease.</p>},
  author       = {Jiménez-Saiz, Rodrigo and Anipindi, Varun C. and Galipeau, Heather and Ellenbogen, Yosef and Chaudhary, Roopali and Koenig, Joshua F. and Gordon, Melissa E. and Walker, Tina D. and Mandur, Talveer S. and Abed, Soumeya and Humbles, Alison and Chu, Derek K. and Erjefält, Jonas and Ask, Kjetil and Verdú, Elena F. and Jordana, Manel},
  issn         = {1664-3224},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Frontiers Media S. A.},
  series       = {Frontiers in Immunology},
  title        = {Microbial Regulation of Enteric Eosinophils and Its Impact on Tissue Remodeling and Th2 Immunity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.00155},
  doi          = {10.3389/fimmu.2020.00155},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2020},
}