Advanced

Relationism as revelation or prescription? : Some thoughts on how Ingold's implicit critique of modernity could be harnessed to political ecology

Hornborg, Alf LU (2018) In Interdisciplinary Science Reviews 43(2-3).
Abstract
Tim Ingold’s critique of mainstream modern experiences of human–environmental relations is highly persuasive but almost completely disconnected from considerations of social relations of power and inequality. His emphasis on the phenomenology of local relations seems inevitably detached from the logic of abstract economic and political systems. This article proposes that the distortions of experience that Ingold identifies tend to be produced by the social and ecological conditions of modern society, to which economic and political inequalities are fundamental. The experiential and the political dimensions of modernity are thus two sides of the same coin, and Ingold’s critical reflections on the phenomenological repercussions of the modern... (More)
Tim Ingold’s critique of mainstream modern experiences of human–environmental relations is highly persuasive but almost completely disconnected from considerations of social relations of power and inequality. His emphasis on the phenomenology of local relations seems inevitably detached from the logic of abstract economic and political systems. This article proposes that the distortions of experience that Ingold identifies tend to be produced by the social and ecological conditions of modern society, to which economic and political inequalities are fundamental. The experiential and the political dimensions of modernity are thus two sides of the same coin, and Ingold’s critical reflections on the phenomenological repercussions of the modern condition converge with the kind of critiques articulated within political ecology. This convergence is particularly intriguing in relation to our understanding of modern technology. Building on ideas and intuitions that have emerged repeatedly through the history of the philosophy of technology, Ingold’s ‘anthropology of technology’ focuses on the experiential aspects of modern engagements with artefacts or material culture, while a political ecology of technology could be expected to unravel how its dependence on asymmetric resource flows illuminate its global, distributive dimension. To reconceptualize modern technology as a means of redistributing human time and natural space is to grasp that it is a phenomenon that straddles the conventional dichotomy of Nature and Society. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Tim Ingold, human-environmental relations, modernity, phenomenology, experience, power, inequality, political ecology, technology
in
Interdisciplinary Science Reviews
volume
43
issue
2-3
publisher
Maney Publishing
external identifiers
  • scopus:85054338553
ISSN
0308-0188
DOI
10.1080/03080188.2018.1524685
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c38dbc9c-2ea5-4675-94dd-afddee7fd082
date added to LUP
2017-07-01 14:30:29
date last changed
2018-11-11 04:53:51
@article{c38dbc9c-2ea5-4675-94dd-afddee7fd082,
  abstract     = {Tim Ingold’s critique of mainstream modern experiences of human–environmental relations is highly persuasive but almost completely disconnected from considerations of social relations of power and inequality. His emphasis on the phenomenology of local relations seems inevitably detached from the logic of abstract economic and political systems. This article proposes that the distortions of experience that Ingold identifies tend to be produced by the social and ecological conditions of modern society, to which economic and political inequalities are fundamental. The experiential and the political dimensions of modernity are thus two sides of the same coin, and Ingold’s critical reflections on the phenomenological repercussions of the modern condition converge with the kind of critiques articulated within political ecology. This convergence is particularly intriguing in relation to our understanding of modern technology. Building on ideas and intuitions that have emerged repeatedly through the history of the philosophy of technology, Ingold’s ‘anthropology of technology’ focuses on the experiential aspects of modern engagements with artefacts or material culture, while a political ecology of technology could be expected to unravel how its dependence on asymmetric resource flows illuminate its global, distributive dimension. To reconceptualize modern technology as a means of redistributing human time and natural space is to grasp that it is a phenomenon that straddles the conventional dichotomy of Nature and Society.},
  author       = {Hornborg, Alf},
  issn         = {0308-0188},
  keyword      = {Tim Ingold,human-environmental relations,modernity,phenomenology,experience,power,inequality,political ecology,technology},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {2-3},
  publisher    = {Maney Publishing},
  series       = {Interdisciplinary Science Reviews},
  title        = {Relationism as revelation or prescription? : Some thoughts on how Ingold's implicit critique of modernity could be harnessed to political ecology},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03080188.2018.1524685},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2018},
}