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Cobalt nanoparticles cause allergic contact dermatitis in humans

Midander, Klara ; Werner, Paulina ; Isaksson, Marlene LU ; Wisgrill, Lukas ; Liden, Carola ; Fyhrquist, Nanna and Julander, Anneli (2023) In British Journal of Dermatology 188(2). p.278-287
Abstract

Background: Cobalt (Co) causes allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and the emerging use of Co nanoparticles (CoNPs) warrants gaining further insight into its potential to elicit ACD in sensitized individuals. Objectives: The aims of the study were to clarify to what extent CoNPs may elicit ACD responses in participants with Co contact allergy, and to evaluate whether the nanoparticles cause a distinct immune response compared with cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in the skin reactions. Methods: Fourteen individuals with Co contact allergy were exposed to CoNPs, CoCl2, a Co-containing hard-metal disc (positive control), and an empty test chamber (negative control) by patch testing. Allergic responses were evaluated clinically by a dermatologist at... (More)

Background: Cobalt (Co) causes allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and the emerging use of Co nanoparticles (CoNPs) warrants gaining further insight into its potential to elicit ACD in sensitized individuals. Objectives: The aims of the study were to clarify to what extent CoNPs may elicit ACD responses in participants with Co contact allergy, and to evaluate whether the nanoparticles cause a distinct immune response compared with cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in the skin reactions. Methods: Fourteen individuals with Co contact allergy were exposed to CoNPs, CoCl2, a Co-containing hard-metal disc (positive control), and an empty test chamber (negative control) by patch testing. Allergic responses were evaluated clinically by a dermatologist at Days 2, 4 and 7. At Day 2, patch-test chambers were removed, and remaining test-substance and skin-wipe samples were collected for inductive-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. Additionally, skin biopsies were taken from patch-test reactions at Day 4 for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, histopathology and ICP-MS analysis of Co skin penetration. Results: Patch testing with CoNPs elicited allergic reactions in Co-sensitized individuals. At all timepoints, clinical assessment revealed significantly lower frequencies of positive patch-test reactions to CoNPs compared with CoCl2 or to the positive control. CoNPs elicited comparable immune responses to CoCl2. Chemical analysis of Co residues in patch-test filters, and on skin, shows lower doses for CoNPs compared with CoCl2. Conclusions: CoNPs potently elicit immune responses in Co-sensitized individuals. Even though patch testing with CoNPs resulted in a lower skin dose than CoCl2, identical immunological profiles were present. Further research is needed to identify the potential harm of CoNPs to human health.

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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Dermatology
volume
188
issue
2
pages
10 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85153965959
  • pmid:36637098
ISSN
0007-0963
DOI
10.1093/bjd/ljac043
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c3cedfc4-1f14-4d16-a323-90fe380d74bc
date added to LUP
2023-07-14 09:19:16
date last changed
2024-04-05 21:02:21
@article{c3cedfc4-1f14-4d16-a323-90fe380d74bc,
  abstract     = {{<p>Background: Cobalt (Co) causes allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and the emerging use of Co nanoparticles (CoNPs) warrants gaining further insight into its potential to elicit ACD in sensitized individuals. Objectives: The aims of the study were to clarify to what extent CoNPs may elicit ACD responses in participants with Co contact allergy, and to evaluate whether the nanoparticles cause a distinct immune response compared with cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in the skin reactions. Methods: Fourteen individuals with Co contact allergy were exposed to CoNPs, CoCl2, a Co-containing hard-metal disc (positive control), and an empty test chamber (negative control) by patch testing. Allergic responses were evaluated clinically by a dermatologist at Days 2, 4 and 7. At Day 2, patch-test chambers were removed, and remaining test-substance and skin-wipe samples were collected for inductive-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. Additionally, skin biopsies were taken from patch-test reactions at Day 4 for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, histopathology and ICP-MS analysis of Co skin penetration. Results: Patch testing with CoNPs elicited allergic reactions in Co-sensitized individuals. At all timepoints, clinical assessment revealed significantly lower frequencies of positive patch-test reactions to CoNPs compared with CoCl2 or to the positive control. CoNPs elicited comparable immune responses to CoCl2. Chemical analysis of Co residues in patch-test filters, and on skin, shows lower doses for CoNPs compared with CoCl2. Conclusions: CoNPs potently elicit immune responses in Co-sensitized individuals. Even though patch testing with CoNPs resulted in a lower skin dose than CoCl2, identical immunological profiles were present. Further research is needed to identify the potential harm of CoNPs to human health.</p>}},
  author       = {{Midander, Klara and Werner, Paulina and Isaksson, Marlene and Wisgrill, Lukas and Liden, Carola and Fyhrquist, Nanna and Julander, Anneli}},
  issn         = {{0007-0963}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{2}},
  pages        = {{278--287}},
  publisher    = {{Wiley-Blackwell}},
  series       = {{British Journal of Dermatology}},
  title        = {{Cobalt nanoparticles cause allergic contact dermatitis in humans}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjd/ljac043}},
  doi          = {{10.1093/bjd/ljac043}},
  volume       = {{188}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}