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Nature vs nurture in knee osteoarthritis – the importance of age, sex and body mass index

Magnusson, K. LU ; Turkiewicz, A. LU and Englund, M. LU (2019) In Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
Abstract

Objective: (1) To estimate the life-time genetic contribution for knee osteoarthritis (OA) surgery and (2) to explore any differences in the genetic contribution across age, sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: We studied the sex-specific genetic contribution to knee OA surgery in a prospective cohort study of 62,490 twins aged 35 years or older with a follow-up period of up to 47 years (10,092 identical and 21,153 non-identical twin pairs, 54% women). To study interactions with age, we graphed the heritabilities over the lifespan for men and women. We also studied the sex-specific heritability across strata of the median BMI to explore any interactions with BMI. Results: The overall heritability of knee OA surgery was 0.53 (95%... (More)

Objective: (1) To estimate the life-time genetic contribution for knee osteoarthritis (OA) surgery and (2) to explore any differences in the genetic contribution across age, sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: We studied the sex-specific genetic contribution to knee OA surgery in a prospective cohort study of 62,490 twins aged 35 years or older with a follow-up period of up to 47 years (10,092 identical and 21,153 non-identical twin pairs, 54% women). To study interactions with age, we graphed the heritabilities over the lifespan for men and women. We also studied the sex-specific heritability across strata of the median BMI to explore any interactions with BMI. Results: The overall heritability of knee OA surgery was 0.53 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 0.31–0.75), with higher heritability among women (H2 = 0.80 (95% CI = 0.73–0.87)) than men (H2 = 0.39 (95% CI = 0.10–0.69)). For men, the heritability started to rise after age 68. The genetic contribution was particularly low in men above median BMI (H2
≥23.7 kg/m2 = 0.08, 95% CI = −0.32–0.48). For women, the heritability was consistently high from age 50 to death, independently of BMI (H2
≥22.5 kg/m2 = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.66–0.87). Conclusion: There is a higher and more consistent genetic contribution for knee OA surgery in women than men. In men the genetic contribution was relatively low and varied with age and BMI.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Gene-environment interaction, Genetics, Heritability, Knee osteoarthritis
in
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85060337386
ISSN
1063-4584
DOI
10.1016/j.joca.2018.12.018
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c4138f5b-506c-4fa5-b3c0-358f6ec18499
date added to LUP
2019-02-01 11:04:23
date last changed
2019-02-27 05:11:46
@article{c4138f5b-506c-4fa5-b3c0-358f6ec18499,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: (1) To estimate the life-time genetic contribution for knee osteoarthritis (OA) surgery and (2) to explore any differences in the genetic contribution across age, sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: We studied the sex-specific genetic contribution to knee OA surgery in a prospective cohort study of 62,490 twins aged 35 years or older with a follow-up period of up to 47 years (10,092 identical and 21,153 non-identical twin pairs, 54% women). To study interactions with age, we graphed the heritabilities over the lifespan for men and women. We also studied the sex-specific heritability across strata of the median BMI to explore any interactions with BMI. Results: The overall heritability of knee OA surgery was 0.53 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 0.31–0.75), with higher heritability among women (H<sup>2</sup> = 0.80 (95% CI = 0.73–0.87)) than men (H<sup>2</sup> = 0.39 (95% CI = 0.10–0.69)). For men, the heritability started to rise after age 68. The genetic contribution was particularly low in men above median BMI (H<sup>2</sup><br>
                            <sub>≥23.7 kg/m2</sub> = 0.08, 95% CI = −0.32–0.48). For women, the heritability was consistently high from age 50 to death, independently of BMI (H<sup>2</sup><br>
                            <sub>≥22.5 kg/m2</sub> = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.66–0.87). Conclusion: There is a higher and more consistent genetic contribution for knee OA surgery in women than men. In men the genetic contribution was relatively low and varied with age and BMI.</p>},
  author       = {Magnusson, K. and Turkiewicz, A. and Englund, M.},
  issn         = {1063-4584},
  keyword      = {Gene-environment interaction,Genetics,Heritability,Knee osteoarthritis},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Osteoarthritis and Cartilage},
  title        = {Nature vs nurture in knee osteoarthritis – the importance of age, sex and body mass index},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2018.12.018},
  year         = {2019},
}