Advanced

Cervical cancer risk perceptions, sexual risk behaviors and sexually transmitted infections among Bivalent Human Papillomavirus vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda - 5 year follow up study

Kumakech, Edward; Andersson, Sören; Wabinga, Henry; Musubika, Caroline; Kirimunda, Samuel and Berggren, Vanja LU (2017) In BMC Women's Health 17(1). p.1-12
Abstract

Background: Previous studies were conflicting regarding the associations between HPV vaccination, cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors and STIs. This study compared the HPV-vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda regarding cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors, syphilis and HIV infections 5 years after vaccine implementation. Methods: This was a population-based comparative cross-sectional survey conducted in Uganda. The 438 participants were sexually active young women aged 15-24 years and mean age was 18.6 (SD 1.4). The majority (53.0%) were HPV-vaccinated in 2008 without assessment of sexual activity prior to HPV vaccination. Upon verbal assessment of sexual activity at the... (More)

Background: Previous studies were conflicting regarding the associations between HPV vaccination, cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors and STIs. This study compared the HPV-vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda regarding cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors, syphilis and HIV infections 5 years after vaccine implementation. Methods: This was a population-based comparative cross-sectional survey conducted in Uganda. The 438 participants were sexually active young women aged 15-24 years and mean age was 18.6 (SD 1.4). The majority (53.0%) were HPV-vaccinated in 2008 without assessment of sexual activity prior to HPV vaccination. Upon verbal assessment of sexual activity at the time of follow-up, data were collected using a questionnaire and laboratory testing of blood samples for syphilis and HIV infections. Results: There were no significant differences between the HPV-vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups regarding the prevalence of high-risk sexual behaviors, syphilis and HIV infections. Cervical cancer risk perceptions and age at sexual debut were nonetheless significantly lower among the vaccinated group compared to their non-vaccinated counterparts. However, HPV vaccination was not significantly associated to cervical cancer risk perceptions and early age at sexual debut in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: We found no associations between HPV vaccination, cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors, syphilis and HIV infections among young women in Uganda 5 years after vaccine implementation. Young girls in the study population were found to be sexually active at a young age, affirming the importance of targeting girls of younger age for HPV vaccination.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, Cervical cancer risk perceptions, Sexual risk behaviors, Sexually transmitted infections, Uganda, Young women
in
BMC Women's Health
volume
17
issue
1
pages
1 - 12
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85020029260
  • wos:000402564800002
ISSN
1472-6874
DOI
10.1186/s12905-017-0394-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c4cb7701-ae8f-413f-9ddc-27153dfdbce0
date added to LUP
2017-06-19 10:26:30
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:41:56
@article{c4cb7701-ae8f-413f-9ddc-27153dfdbce0,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Previous studies were conflicting regarding the associations between HPV vaccination, cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors and STIs. This study compared the HPV-vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda regarding cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors, syphilis and HIV infections 5 years after vaccine implementation. Methods: This was a population-based comparative cross-sectional survey conducted in Uganda. The 438 participants were sexually active young women aged 15-24 years and mean age was 18.6 (SD 1.4). The majority (53.0%) were HPV-vaccinated in 2008 without assessment of sexual activity prior to HPV vaccination. Upon verbal assessment of sexual activity at the time of follow-up, data were collected using a questionnaire and laboratory testing of blood samples for syphilis and HIV infections. Results: There were no significant differences between the HPV-vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups regarding the prevalence of high-risk sexual behaviors, syphilis and HIV infections. Cervical cancer risk perceptions and age at sexual debut were nonetheless significantly lower among the vaccinated group compared to their non-vaccinated counterparts. However, HPV vaccination was not significantly associated to cervical cancer risk perceptions and early age at sexual debut in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: We found no associations between HPV vaccination, cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors, syphilis and HIV infections among young women in Uganda 5 years after vaccine implementation. Young girls in the study population were found to be sexually active at a young age, affirming the importance of targeting girls of younger age for HPV vaccination.</p>},
  articleno    = {40},
  author       = {Kumakech, Edward and Andersson, Sören and Wabinga, Henry and Musubika, Caroline and Kirimunda, Samuel and Berggren, Vanja},
  issn         = {1472-6874},
  keyword      = {Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination,Cervical cancer risk perceptions,Sexual risk behaviors,Sexually transmitted infections,Uganda,Young women},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--12},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Women's Health},
  title        = {Cervical cancer risk perceptions, sexual risk behaviors and sexually transmitted infections among Bivalent Human Papillomavirus vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda - 5 year follow up study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12905-017-0394-y},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2017},
}