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Pathophysiology and management of sensitive skin : position paper from the special interest group on sensitive skin of the International Forum for the Study of Itch (IFSI)

Misery, L. ; Weisshaar, E. ; Brenaut, E. ; Evers, A. W.M. ; Huet, F. ; Ständer, S. ; Reich, A. ; Berardesca, E. ; Serra-Baldrich, E. and Wallengren, J. LU , et al. (2020) In Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 34(2). p.222-229
Abstract

The special interest group on sensitive skin of the International Forum for the Study of Itch previously defined sensitive skin as a syndrome defined by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations (stinging, burning, pain, pruritus and tingling sensations) in response to stimuli that normally should not provoke such sensations. This additional paper focuses on the pathophysiology and the management of sensitive skin. Sensitive skin is not an immunological disorder but is related to alterations of the skin nervous system. Skin barrier abnormalities are frequently associated, but there is no cause and direct relationship. Further studies are needed to better understand the pathophysiology of sensitive skin – as well as the inducing factors.... (More)

The special interest group on sensitive skin of the International Forum for the Study of Itch previously defined sensitive skin as a syndrome defined by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations (stinging, burning, pain, pruritus and tingling sensations) in response to stimuli that normally should not provoke such sensations. This additional paper focuses on the pathophysiology and the management of sensitive skin. Sensitive skin is not an immunological disorder but is related to alterations of the skin nervous system. Skin barrier abnormalities are frequently associated, but there is no cause and direct relationship. Further studies are needed to better understand the pathophysiology of sensitive skin – as well as the inducing factors. Avoidance of possible triggering factors and the use of well-tolerated cosmetics, especially those containing inhibitors of unpleasant sensations, might be suggested for patients with sensitive skin. The role of psychosocial factors, such as stress or negative expectations, might be relevant for subgroups of patients. To date, there is no clinical trial supporting the use of topical or systemic drugs in sensitive skin. The published data are not sufficient to reach a consensus on sensitive skin management. In general, patients with sensitive skin require a personalized approach, taking into account various biomedical, neural and psychosocial factors affecting sensitive skin.

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publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
volume
34
issue
2
pages
222 - 229
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:31660659
  • scopus:85074187863
ISSN
0926-9959
DOI
10.1111/jdv.16000
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c5f21452-5d71-4120-bb50-08d256df785c
date added to LUP
2019-11-22 10:14:02
date last changed
2021-01-19 02:27:56
@article{c5f21452-5d71-4120-bb50-08d256df785c,
  abstract     = {<p>The special interest group on sensitive skin of the International Forum for the Study of Itch previously defined sensitive skin as a syndrome defined by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations (stinging, burning, pain, pruritus and tingling sensations) in response to stimuli that normally should not provoke such sensations. This additional paper focuses on the pathophysiology and the management of sensitive skin. Sensitive skin is not an immunological disorder but is related to alterations of the skin nervous system. Skin barrier abnormalities are frequently associated, but there is no cause and direct relationship. Further studies are needed to better understand the pathophysiology of sensitive skin – as well as the inducing factors. Avoidance of possible triggering factors and the use of well-tolerated cosmetics, especially those containing inhibitors of unpleasant sensations, might be suggested for patients with sensitive skin. The role of psychosocial factors, such as stress or negative expectations, might be relevant for subgroups of patients. To date, there is no clinical trial supporting the use of topical or systemic drugs in sensitive skin. The published data are not sufficient to reach a consensus on sensitive skin management. In general, patients with sensitive skin require a personalized approach, taking into account various biomedical, neural and psychosocial factors affecting sensitive skin.</p>},
  author       = {Misery, L. and Weisshaar, E. and Brenaut, E. and Evers, A. W.M. and Huet, F. and Ständer, S. and Reich, A. and Berardesca, E. and Serra-Baldrich, E. and Wallengren, J. and Linder, D. and Fluhr, J. W. and Szepietowski, J. C. and Maibach, H. and Honari, Golara and Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle and Takamori, Kenji and Richters, Renée},
  issn         = {0926-9959},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {222--229},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology},
  title        = {Pathophysiology and management of sensitive skin : position paper from the special interest group on sensitive skin of the International Forum for the Study of Itch (IFSI)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jdv.16000},
  doi          = {10.1111/jdv.16000},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2020},
}