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Modeling Parkinson's disease and treatment complications in rodents : Potentials and pitfalls of the current options

Francardo, Veronica LU (2018) In Behavioural Brain Research 352. p.142-150
Abstract

Animal models of neurological deficits are essential to assess new therapeutic options and reduce treatment complications. Over the last decades, several rodent models of Parkinson's disease have been developed, and have now become the first-line experimental tool for therapeutic screening purposes. Which model is the most predictive for identifying the efficacy of symptomatic or disease-modifying interventions is still a matter of debate. None of the models so far available is able to recapitulate all the features of the human disease, but several well-characterized models with complementary features currently provide a valuable repertoire of tools to address specific scientific hypotheses. This article reviews the rodent models of... (More)

Animal models of neurological deficits are essential to assess new therapeutic options and reduce treatment complications. Over the last decades, several rodent models of Parkinson's disease have been developed, and have now become the first-line experimental tool for therapeutic screening purposes. Which model is the most predictive for identifying the efficacy of symptomatic or disease-modifying interventions is still a matter of debate. None of the models so far available is able to recapitulate all the features of the human disease, but several well-characterized models with complementary features currently provide a valuable repertoire of tools to address specific scientific hypotheses. This article reviews the rodent models of Parkinson's disease currently available, with a particular focus on symptomatic models used to mimic parkinsonian motor deficits and treatment-related complications. Advantages and disadvantages of each model are presented and discussed to assist the decision of investigators who wonder which model may be the most suitable for their particular research project.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
6-OHDA, Animal models, L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, MPTP, Parkinson's disease, Rodents
in
Behavioural Brain Research
volume
352
pages
142 - 150
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85043470579
ISSN
0166-4328
DOI
10.1016/j.bbr.2017.12.014
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c6ecd8bc-e4ac-45d8-8b0c-1e986e2a7bb2
date added to LUP
2018-03-22 13:42:14
date last changed
2019-04-23 04:29:39
@article{c6ecd8bc-e4ac-45d8-8b0c-1e986e2a7bb2,
  abstract     = {<p>Animal models of neurological deficits are essential to assess new therapeutic options and reduce treatment complications. Over the last decades, several rodent models of Parkinson's disease have been developed, and have now become the first-line experimental tool for therapeutic screening purposes. Which model is the most predictive for identifying the efficacy of symptomatic or disease-modifying interventions is still a matter of debate. None of the models so far available is able to recapitulate all the features of the human disease, but several well-characterized models with complementary features currently provide a valuable repertoire of tools to address specific scientific hypotheses. This article reviews the rodent models of Parkinson's disease currently available, with a particular focus on symptomatic models used to mimic parkinsonian motor deficits and treatment-related complications. Advantages and disadvantages of each model are presented and discussed to assist the decision of investigators who wonder which model may be the most suitable for their particular research project.</p>},
  author       = {Francardo, Veronica},
  issn         = {0166-4328},
  keyword      = {6-OHDA,Animal models,L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia,MPTP,Parkinson's disease,Rodents},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {142--150},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Behavioural Brain Research},
  title        = {Modeling Parkinson's disease and treatment complications in rodents : Potentials and pitfalls of the current options},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2017.12.014},
  volume       = {352},
  year         = {2018},
}