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Family history of cardiometabolic diseases and its association with arterial stiffness in the Malmö Diet Cancer cohort

Fatehali, Abd Al Hakim; Gottsäter, Mikael LU and Nilsson, Peter M. LU (2017) In Journal of Hypertension
Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: Arterial stiffening increases with age and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Several risk factors have been shown to predict the development of arterial stiffening; however, a positive family history (FH+) of cardiometabolic disease (CMD) and hypertension has not been extensively studied. We hypothesize that FH+ of CMD plays a significant role in the development of arterial stiffening in offspring. METHODS:: We used data from the population-based Malmö Diet Cancer study (n?=?3056) examined in 1992–1996 and again in 2007–2012. Several variables were analysed, including anthropometrics, carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity and FH+. The association between FH+ of CMD and arterial stiffening in the offspring was... (More)

OBJECTIVE:: Arterial stiffening increases with age and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Several risk factors have been shown to predict the development of arterial stiffening; however, a positive family history (FH+) of cardiometabolic disease (CMD) and hypertension has not been extensively studied. We hypothesize that FH+ of CMD plays a significant role in the development of arterial stiffening in offspring. METHODS:: We used data from the population-based Malmö Diet Cancer study (n?=?3056) examined in 1992–1996 and again in 2007–2012. Several variables were analysed, including anthropometrics, carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity and FH+. The association between FH+ of CMD and arterial stiffening in the offspring was analysed with analysis of covariance in SPSS. FH+ was subdivided into three categories: family history for cardiovascular events (FH-CVEs), family history for diabetes mellitus type 2 (FH-DM2) and family history for hypertension (FH-HT). The first analysis of covariance-model was adjusted for age, sex, mean arterial pressure and heart rate; the second model additionally adjusted for self-reported medical history in the offspring. RESULTS:: Data indicated that FH-CVE (F?=?14.64, P?<?0.001), FH-DM2 (F?=?18.57, P?<?0.001) and FH-HT (F?=?13.92, P?<?0.001) all significantly increased carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity levels. The results remained when additional adjustment was made for confounders and for self-reported CMD in the index participants, respectively, for FH-CVE (F?=?12.47, P?<?0.001), FH-DM2 (F?=?7.62, P?=?0.006) as well as for FH-HT (F?=?7.30, P?=?0.007). CONCLUSION:: These findings indicate that a FH+ of cardiometabolic conditions and hypertension affects arterial stiffness in offspring independently of haemodynamic factors and self-reported CMD in the offspring without sex differences.

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Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
in
Journal of Hypertension
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • scopus:85021691949
ISSN
0263-6352
DOI
10.1097/HJH.0000000000001457
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c7bc0fca-3fdf-434a-a940-0ed4af054873
date added to LUP
2017-08-10 11:37:56
date last changed
2017-08-11 03:00:03
@article{c7bc0fca-3fdf-434a-a940-0ed4af054873,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVE:: Arterial stiffening increases with age and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Several risk factors have been shown to predict the development of arterial stiffening; however, a positive family history (FH+) of cardiometabolic disease (CMD) and hypertension has not been extensively studied. We hypothesize that FH+ of CMD plays a significant role in the development of arterial stiffening in offspring. METHODS:: We used data from the population-based Malmö Diet Cancer study (n?=?3056) examined in 1992–1996 and again in 2007–2012. Several variables were analysed, including anthropometrics, carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity and FH+. The association between FH+ of CMD and arterial stiffening in the offspring was analysed with analysis of covariance in SPSS. FH+ was subdivided into three categories: family history for cardiovascular events (FH-CVEs), family history for diabetes mellitus type 2 (FH-DM2) and family history for hypertension (FH-HT). The first analysis of covariance-model was adjusted for age, sex, mean arterial pressure and heart rate; the second model additionally adjusted for self-reported medical history in the offspring. RESULTS:: Data indicated that FH-CVE (F?=?14.64, P?&lt;?0.001), FH-DM2 (F?=?18.57, P?&lt;?0.001) and FH-HT (F?=?13.92, P?&lt;?0.001) all significantly increased carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity levels. The results remained when additional adjustment was made for confounders and for self-reported CMD in the index participants, respectively, for FH-CVE (F?=?12.47, P?&lt;?0.001), FH-DM2 (F?=?7.62, P?=?0.006) as well as for FH-HT (F?=?7.30, P?=?0.007). CONCLUSION:: These findings indicate that a FH+ of cardiometabolic conditions and hypertension affects arterial stiffness in offspring independently of haemodynamic factors and self-reported CMD in the offspring without sex differences.</p>},
  author       = {Fatehali, Abd Al Hakim and Gottsäter, Mikael and Nilsson, Peter M.},
  issn         = {0263-6352},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of Hypertension},
  title        = {Family history of cardiometabolic diseases and its association with arterial stiffness in the Malmö Diet Cancer cohort},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000001457},
  year         = {2017},
}