Advanced

Några beröringspunkter mellan kontemplation och döden : inspirerat av Catharina Stenqvists författarskap

Appelros, Erica LU (2016) In Svensk Teologisk Kvartalskrift 92(1). p.2-11
Abstract
Catharina Stenqvist, former professor in philosophy of religion at Lund University, alludes that there are similarities between death and contemplation. In this article I suggest three possible such similarities, what they may consist in, how they may be given grounds, and examples of how further research may be carried out. The three suggested points of similarity are 1) experiential similarities, 2) physiological similarities, and 3) functional similarities.
The experiential similarities consist mainly in the experience of both death and contemplation being pre-linguistic, not possible to put into words. Empirical research and philosophical argument may provide grounds, and a possible route for further research would be to... (More)
Catharina Stenqvist, former professor in philosophy of religion at Lund University, alludes that there are similarities between death and contemplation. In this article I suggest three possible such similarities, what they may consist in, how they may be given grounds, and examples of how further research may be carried out. The three suggested points of similarity are 1) experiential similarities, 2) physiological similarities, and 3) functional similarities.
The experiential similarities consist mainly in the experience of both death and contemplation being pre-linguistic, not possible to put into words. Empirical research and philosophical argument may provide grounds, and a possible route for further research would be to investigate how the incorporation of the Christian hope of resurrection would affect the issue.
The suggested physiological similarities consist in the aforementioned experiential similarities also being reflected in the neurophysiological states of the brain during contemplation and death. Empirical research may also here provide grounds, but are to date too scanty to be valid. A question for further research could be to investigate the philosophical and/or theological implications of such a link, should it become properly established.
The functional similarities consist in death and contemplation being mutually used as a therapeutic aid for understanding the other, and both being used as means to reflect on our own death and present life. The grounds are established practices and their effectiveness. Further research may want to compare the therapeutic role of ‘death’ in existential philosophy and in Christian contemplation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
mysticism, döden, Merton, kontemplation
in
Svensk Teologisk Kvartalskrift
volume
92
issue
1
pages
10 pages
publisher
Gleerups Utbildning AB
external identifiers
  • scopus:85021787132
ISSN
0039-6761
language
Swedish
LU publication?
yes
id
c7cba97a-d417-43d5-ac6c-13660eff2cb1
alternative location
http://journals.lub.lu.se/index.php/STK/article/view/16534
date added to LUP
2016-12-13 10:44:31
date last changed
2017-07-23 05:21:58
@article{c7cba97a-d417-43d5-ac6c-13660eff2cb1,
  abstract     = {Catharina Stenqvist, former professor in philosophy of religion at Lund University, alludes that there are similarities between death and contemplation. In this article I suggest three possible such similarities, what they may consist in, how they may be given grounds, and examples of how further research may be carried out. The three suggested points of similarity are 1) experiential similarities, 2) physiological similarities, and 3) functional similarities. <br/>The experiential similarities consist mainly in the experience of both death and contemplation being pre-linguistic, not possible to put into words. Empirical research and philosophical argument may provide grounds, and a possible route for further research would be to investigate how the incorporation of the Christian hope of resurrection would affect the issue.<br/>The suggested physiological similarities consist in the aforementioned experiential similarities also being reflected in the neurophysiological states of the brain during contemplation and death. Empirical research may also here provide grounds, but are to date too scanty to be valid. A question for further research could be to investigate the philosophical and/or theological implications of such a link, should it become properly established.<br/>The functional similarities consist in death and contemplation being mutually used as a therapeutic aid for understanding the other, and both being used as means to reflect on our own death and present life. The grounds are established practices and their effectiveness. Further research may want to compare the therapeutic role of ‘death’ in existential philosophy and in Christian contemplation.},
  articleno    = {1},
  author       = {Appelros, Erica},
  issn         = {0039-6761},
  keyword      = {mysticism,döden,Merton,kontemplation},
  language     = {swe},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {2--11},
  publisher    = {Gleerups Utbildning AB},
  series       = {Svensk Teologisk Kvartalskrift},
  title        = {Några beröringspunkter mellan kontemplation och döden :  inspirerat av Catharina Stenqvists författarskap},
  volume       = {92},
  year         = {2016},
}