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Global and domain-specific life satisfaction among older adults with long-term spinal cord injury

Jörgensen, Sophie LU ; Hedgren, Linn; Sundelin, Anna and Lexell, Jan LU (2019) In Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
Abstract

Objective: Although life expectancy after spinal cord injury (SCI) has increased, knowledge of life satisfaction and associated factors among older adults with long-term SCI is still very limited. The objective of this study was, therefore, to assess global and domain-specific life satisfaction among older adults with long-term SCI and investigate the association with sociodemographics, injury characteristics and secondary health conditions. Design: Cross-sectional cohort study. Data from the Swedish Aging with Spinal Cord Injury Study (SASCIS). Setting: Community settings in southern Sweden. Participants: Seventy-eight individuals (32% women, injury levels C1-L3, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) A-D) mean age... (More)

Objective: Although life expectancy after spinal cord injury (SCI) has increased, knowledge of life satisfaction and associated factors among older adults with long-term SCI is still very limited. The objective of this study was, therefore, to assess global and domain-specific life satisfaction among older adults with long-term SCI and investigate the association with sociodemographics, injury characteristics and secondary health conditions. Design: Cross-sectional cohort study. Data from the Swedish Aging with Spinal Cord Injury Study (SASCIS). Setting: Community settings in southern Sweden. Participants: Seventy-eight individuals (32% women, injury levels C1-L3, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) A-D) mean age 68 years, mean time since injury 31 years. Interventions: Not applicable. Outcome measures: The Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11). Results: The participants were at least rather satisfied with most of the 11 life domains. They rated the lowest satisfaction with sexual life, activities of daily living and somatic health. Having a partner and being vocationally active was associated with greater satisfaction with life as a whole and with several other life domains. Participants with AIS D injuries were less satisfied with their somatic health than those with tetraplegia AIS A-C and paraplegia AIS A-C injuries. More secondary health conditions were negatively associated with satisfaction in five life domains. Conclusion: Life satisfaction can be affected many years after SCI. The social context, participation in meaningful activities and minimizing secondary health conditions seem to be important for maintaining life satisfaction in older adults with a long-term injury.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Aging, Quality of life, Rehabilitation, Spinal cord injuries
in
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
publisher
Maney Publishing
external identifiers
  • scopus:85066072471
ISSN
1079-0268
DOI
10.1080/10790268.2019.1610618
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c814e366-0d26-4406-9e3d-63f7eb25c8af
date added to LUP
2019-06-14 12:39:22
date last changed
2019-07-02 04:48:05
@article{c814e366-0d26-4406-9e3d-63f7eb25c8af,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: Although life expectancy after spinal cord injury (SCI) has increased, knowledge of life satisfaction and associated factors among older adults with long-term SCI is still very limited. The objective of this study was, therefore, to assess global and domain-specific life satisfaction among older adults with long-term SCI and investigate the association with sociodemographics, injury characteristics and secondary health conditions. Design: Cross-sectional cohort study. Data from the Swedish Aging with Spinal Cord Injury Study (SASCIS). Setting: Community settings in southern Sweden. Participants: Seventy-eight individuals (32% women, injury levels C1-L3, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) A-D) mean age 68 years, mean time since injury 31 years. Interventions: Not applicable. Outcome measures: The Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11). Results: The participants were at least rather satisfied with most of the 11 life domains. They rated the lowest satisfaction with sexual life, activities of daily living and somatic health. Having a partner and being vocationally active was associated with greater satisfaction with life as a whole and with several other life domains. Participants with AIS D injuries were less satisfied with their somatic health than those with tetraplegia AIS A-C and paraplegia AIS A-C injuries. More secondary health conditions were negatively associated with satisfaction in five life domains. Conclusion: Life satisfaction can be affected many years after SCI. The social context, participation in meaningful activities and minimizing secondary health conditions seem to be important for maintaining life satisfaction in older adults with a long-term injury.</p>},
  author       = {Jörgensen, Sophie and Hedgren, Linn and Sundelin, Anna and Lexell, Jan},
  issn         = {1079-0268},
  keyword      = {Aging,Quality of life,Rehabilitation,Spinal cord injuries},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  publisher    = {Maney Publishing},
  series       = {Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine},
  title        = {Global and domain-specific life satisfaction among older adults with long-term spinal cord injury},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10790268.2019.1610618},
  year         = {2019},
}