Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Breeding biology of fluttering shearwaters (Puffinus gavia) on burgess Island in northern New Zealand

Berg, Martin ; Linnebjerg, Jannie F. LU ; Ismar, Stefanie M.H. ; Gaskin, Chris P. and Rayner, Matt J. (2018) In Emu 118(2). p.173-182
Abstract

The Fluttering Shearwater (Puffinus gavia) is an abundant seabird endemic to breeding colonies in northern and central New Zealand. The species remains poorly studied, and here we present the first study to examine its breeding biology in detail. Fluttering Shearwater nests were monitored from laying in September to fledging in January 2016 on Burgess Island in the outer Hauraki Gulf, northern New Zealand. Nine (22%) of forty-one natural nests were located under dense vegetation on the ground. Eggs were laid over a period of 39 days with laying peaking on 12 September. Incubation length was 50.0 ± 3.7 days and chicks fledged after an average of 74.2 ± 4.3 days, from late December to the end of January. Chick growth corresponds to the... (More)

The Fluttering Shearwater (Puffinus gavia) is an abundant seabird endemic to breeding colonies in northern and central New Zealand. The species remains poorly studied, and here we present the first study to examine its breeding biology in detail. Fluttering Shearwater nests were monitored from laying in September to fledging in January 2016 on Burgess Island in the outer Hauraki Gulf, northern New Zealand. Nine (22%) of forty-one natural nests were located under dense vegetation on the ground. Eggs were laid over a period of 39 days with laying peaking on 12 September. Incubation length was 50.0 ± 3.7 days and chicks fledged after an average of 74.2 ± 4.3 days, from late December to the end of January. Chick growth corresponds to the pattern observed for other Procellariiformes, gaining body mass rapidly to a maximum of 115% of adult mass, and then losing mass until fledging. Chicks were fed most nights throughout chickrearing. Breeding success was 63.8% and similar to other Puffinus species breeding in pest-free colonies. This study provides baseline biological data for a poorly studied, yet common, New Zealand endemic seabird. The obtained new information will allow for further ecological investigations and improved conservation management.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Breeding phenology, Breeding success, Chick growth, Procellariiformes, Provisioning, Seabirds
in
Emu
volume
118
issue
2
pages
10 pages
publisher
CSIRO Publishing
external identifiers
  • scopus:85055751481
ISSN
0158-4197
DOI
10.1080/01584197.2017.1366831
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c8cc3999-343c-41f0-97fe-ed9f0f7ec14f
date added to LUP
2018-11-26 08:17:31
date last changed
2021-09-22 04:46:17
@article{c8cc3999-343c-41f0-97fe-ed9f0f7ec14f,
  abstract     = {<p>The Fluttering Shearwater (Puffinus gavia) is an abundant seabird endemic to breeding colonies in northern and central New Zealand. The species remains poorly studied, and here we present the first study to examine its breeding biology in detail. Fluttering Shearwater nests were monitored from laying in September to fledging in January 2016 on Burgess Island in the outer Hauraki Gulf, northern New Zealand. Nine (22%) of forty-one natural nests were located under dense vegetation on the ground. Eggs were laid over a period of 39 days with laying peaking on 12 September. Incubation length was 50.0 ± 3.7 days and chicks fledged after an average of 74.2 ± 4.3 days, from late December to the end of January. Chick growth corresponds to the pattern observed for other Procellariiformes, gaining body mass rapidly to a maximum of 115% of adult mass, and then losing mass until fledging. Chicks were fed most nights throughout chickrearing. Breeding success was 63.8% and similar to other Puffinus species breeding in pest-free colonies. This study provides baseline biological data for a poorly studied, yet common, New Zealand endemic seabird. The obtained new information will allow for further ecological investigations and improved conservation management.</p>},
  author       = {Berg, Martin and Linnebjerg, Jannie F. and Ismar, Stefanie M.H. and Gaskin, Chris P. and Rayner, Matt J.},
  issn         = {0158-4197},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {173--182},
  publisher    = {CSIRO Publishing},
  series       = {Emu},
  title        = {Breeding biology of fluttering shearwaters (Puffinus gavia) on burgess Island in northern New Zealand},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01584197.2017.1366831},
  doi          = {10.1080/01584197.2017.1366831},
  volume       = {118},
  year         = {2018},
}