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Bees in space - Swarm technologies' unauthorised deployment of SmallSats and Art. VI of the outer space treaty

Wagner, Scarlet LU (2018) 69th International Astronautical Congress: #InvolvingEveryone, IAC 2018 In Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2018-October.
Abstract

In March 2018, it became publically known that Indian Space Research Organisation ISRO's launch on 12 January 2018 deployed four space objects into orbit that were not authorised by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the United States of America (US). Prior to the launch with ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, US-based tech start-up Swarm Technologies had received a dismissal by the FCC of their application for a license to launch their four SpaceBEE satellites. This may be the first publically known occasion of a potentially unauthorised deployment of space objects since the inception of international space law. This paper centres around an assessment of the launch of the SpaceBEE satellites under national and... (More)

In March 2018, it became publically known that Indian Space Research Organisation ISRO's launch on 12 January 2018 deployed four space objects into orbit that were not authorised by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the United States of America (US). Prior to the launch with ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, US-based tech start-up Swarm Technologies had received a dismissal by the FCC of their application for a license to launch their four SpaceBEE satellites. This may be the first publically known occasion of a potentially unauthorised deployment of space objects since the inception of international space law. This paper centres around an assessment of the launch of the SpaceBEE satellites under national and international space law. Regarding the latter, the regime of international responsibility of States is considered under both Article VI of the 1967 Outer Space Treaty and general public international law. The paper concludes that while it is too early to foresee the ultimate consequences of Swarm Technologies' conduct, a discussion of the relevant national and international legal frameworks proves instructive. The theoretical attention that the interpretation of Art. VI OST has been getting over the past decades is met with a sense of practical necessity triggered by the deployment of the SpaceBEEs.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Authorisation, Non-governmental entities, Outer Space Treaty, Public international law, Smallsats, State responsibility
host publication
Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC
series title
Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC
volume
2018-October
conference name
69th International Astronautical Congress: #InvolvingEveryone, IAC 2018
conference location
Bremen, Germany
conference dates
2018-10-01 - 2018-10-05
external identifiers
  • scopus:85065317178
ISSN
0074-1795
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ca2c59d7-bf5d-49e0-a28c-aa22f3239319
date added to LUP
2019-06-03 14:06:08
date last changed
2019-06-17 15:54:38
@inproceedings{ca2c59d7-bf5d-49e0-a28c-aa22f3239319,
  abstract     = {<p>In March 2018, it became publically known that Indian Space Research Organisation ISRO's launch on 12 January 2018 deployed four space objects into orbit that were not authorised by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the United States of America (US). Prior to the launch with ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, US-based tech start-up Swarm Technologies had received a dismissal by the FCC of their application for a license to launch their four SpaceBEE satellites. This may be the first publically known occasion of a potentially unauthorised deployment of space objects since the inception of international space law. This paper centres around an assessment of the launch of the SpaceBEE satellites under national and international space law. Regarding the latter, the regime of international responsibility of States is considered under both Article VI of the 1967 Outer Space Treaty and general public international law. The paper concludes that while it is too early to foresee the ultimate consequences of Swarm Technologies' conduct, a discussion of the relevant national and international legal frameworks proves instructive. The theoretical attention that the interpretation of Art. VI OST has been getting over the past decades is met with a sense of practical necessity triggered by the deployment of the SpaceBEEs.</p>},
  author       = {Wagner, Scarlet},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC},
  issn         = {0074-1795},
  keyword      = {Authorisation,Non-governmental entities,Outer Space Treaty,Public international law,Smallsats,State responsibility},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Bremen, Germany},
  title        = {Bees in space - Swarm technologies' unauthorised deployment of SmallSats and Art. VI of the outer space treaty},
  volume       = {2018-October},
  year         = {2018},
}