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Biogeography of bacterial communities exposed to progressive long-term environmental change

Logares, Ramiro; Lindstrom, Eva S.; Langenheder, Silke; Logue, Jürg Brendan LU ; Paterson, Harriet; Laybourn-Parry, Johanna; Rengefors, Karin LU ; Tranvik, Lars and Bertilsson, Stefan (2013) In The Isme Journal 7(5). p.937-948
Abstract
The response of microbial communities to long-term environmental change is poorly understood. Here, we study bacterioplankton communities in a unique system of coastal Antarctic lakes that were exposed to progressive long-term environmental change, using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA gene (V3-V4 regions). At the time of formation, most of the studied lakes harbored marine-coastal microbial communities, as they were connected to the sea. During the past 20 000 years, most lakes isolated from the sea, and subsequently they experienced a gradual, but strong, salinity change that eventually developed into a gradient ranging from freshwater (salinity 0) to hypersaline (salinity 100). Our results indicated that present bacterioplankton... (More)
The response of microbial communities to long-term environmental change is poorly understood. Here, we study bacterioplankton communities in a unique system of coastal Antarctic lakes that were exposed to progressive long-term environmental change, using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA gene (V3-V4 regions). At the time of formation, most of the studied lakes harbored marine-coastal microbial communities, as they were connected to the sea. During the past 20 000 years, most lakes isolated from the sea, and subsequently they experienced a gradual, but strong, salinity change that eventually developed into a gradient ranging from freshwater (salinity 0) to hypersaline (salinity 100). Our results indicated that present bacterioplankton community composition was strongly correlated with salinity and weakly correlated with geographical distance between lakes. A few abundant taxa were shared between some lakes and coastal marine communities. Nevertheless, lakes contained a large number of taxa that were not detected in the adjacent sea. Abundant and rare taxa within saline communities presented similar biogeography, suggesting that these groups have comparable environmental sensitivity. Habitat specialists and generalists were detected among abundant and rare taxa, with specialists being relatively more abundant at the extremes of the salinity gradient. Altogether, progressive long-term salinity change appears to have promoted the diversification of bacterioplankton communities by modifying the composition of ancestral communities and by allowing the establishment of new taxa. The ISME Journal (2013) 7, 937-948; doi:10.1038/ismej.2012.168; published online 20 December 2012 (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Antarctica, Bacteria, environmental change, long-term, pyrosequencing, salinity
in
The Isme Journal
volume
7
issue
5
pages
937 - 948
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000317963300005
  • scopus:84876822224
ISSN
1751-7362
DOI
10.1038/ismej.2012.168
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cb94c7a0-0530-48f2-bec3-0699551146dd (old id 3853633)
date added to LUP
2013-06-20 09:00:45
date last changed
2019-08-14 01:25:03
@article{cb94c7a0-0530-48f2-bec3-0699551146dd,
  abstract     = {The response of microbial communities to long-term environmental change is poorly understood. Here, we study bacterioplankton communities in a unique system of coastal Antarctic lakes that were exposed to progressive long-term environmental change, using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA gene (V3-V4 regions). At the time of formation, most of the studied lakes harbored marine-coastal microbial communities, as they were connected to the sea. During the past 20 000 years, most lakes isolated from the sea, and subsequently they experienced a gradual, but strong, salinity change that eventually developed into a gradient ranging from freshwater (salinity 0) to hypersaline (salinity 100). Our results indicated that present bacterioplankton community composition was strongly correlated with salinity and weakly correlated with geographical distance between lakes. A few abundant taxa were shared between some lakes and coastal marine communities. Nevertheless, lakes contained a large number of taxa that were not detected in the adjacent sea. Abundant and rare taxa within saline communities presented similar biogeography, suggesting that these groups have comparable environmental sensitivity. Habitat specialists and generalists were detected among abundant and rare taxa, with specialists being relatively more abundant at the extremes of the salinity gradient. Altogether, progressive long-term salinity change appears to have promoted the diversification of bacterioplankton communities by modifying the composition of ancestral communities and by allowing the establishment of new taxa. The ISME Journal (2013) 7, 937-948; doi:10.1038/ismej.2012.168; published online 20 December 2012},
  author       = {Logares, Ramiro and Lindstrom, Eva S. and Langenheder, Silke and Logue, Jürg Brendan and Paterson, Harriet and Laybourn-Parry, Johanna and Rengefors, Karin and Tranvik, Lars and Bertilsson, Stefan},
  issn         = {1751-7362},
  keyword      = {Antarctica,Bacteria,environmental change,long-term,pyrosequencing,salinity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {937--948},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {The Isme Journal},
  title        = {Biogeography of bacterial communities exposed to progressive long-term environmental change},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2012.168},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2013},
}