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Tropospheric ozone radiative forcing uncertainty due to pre-industrial fire and biogenic emissions

Rowlinson, Matthew J. ; Rap, Alexandru ; Hamilton, Douglas S. ; Pope, Richard J. ; Hantson, Stijn ; Arnold, Steve R. ; Kaplan, Jed O. LU ; Arneth, Almut LU ; Chipperfield, Martyn P. and Forster, Piers M. , et al. (2020) In Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 20(18). p.10937-10951
Abstract

pTropospheric ozone concentrations are sensitive to natural emissions of precursor compounds. In contrast to existing assumptions, recent evidence indicates that terrestrial vegetation emissions in the pre-industrial era were larger than in the present day. We use a chemical transport model and a radiative transfer model to show that revised inventories of pre-industrial fire and biogenic emissions lead to an increase in simulated pre-industrial ozone concentrations, decreasing the estimated pre-industrial to present-day tropospheric ozone radiative forcing by up to 34 % (0.38 to 0.25 W mspan classCombining double low line"inline-formula"-2/span). We find that this change is sensitive to employing biomass burning and biogenic emissions... (More)

pTropospheric ozone concentrations are sensitive to natural emissions of precursor compounds. In contrast to existing assumptions, recent evidence indicates that terrestrial vegetation emissions in the pre-industrial era were larger than in the present day. We use a chemical transport model and a radiative transfer model to show that revised inventories of pre-industrial fire and biogenic emissions lead to an increase in simulated pre-industrial ozone concentrations, decreasing the estimated pre-industrial to present-day tropospheric ozone radiative forcing by up to 34 % (0.38 to 0.25 W mspan classCombining double low line"inline-formula"-2/span). We find that this change is sensitive to employing biomass burning and biogenic emissions inventories based on matching vegetation patterns, as the co-location of emission sources enhances the effect on ozone formation. Our forcing estimates are at the lower end of existing uncertainty range estimates (0.2-0.6 W mspan classCombining double low line"inline-formula"-2/span), without accounting for other sources of uncertainty. Thus, future work should focus on reassessing the uncertainty range of tropospheric ozone radiative forcing.

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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
volume
20
issue
18
pages
15 pages
publisher
Copernicus Gesellschaft mbH
external identifiers
  • scopus:85092052948
ISSN
1680-7316
DOI
10.5194/acp-20-10937-2020
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cbbe6ff5-85bc-4043-8314-b1f55dc252cc
date added to LUP
2020-10-16 10:59:21
date last changed
2020-10-16 14:53:54
@article{cbbe6ff5-85bc-4043-8314-b1f55dc252cc,
  abstract     = {<p>pTropospheric ozone concentrations are sensitive to natural emissions of precursor compounds. In contrast to existing assumptions, recent evidence indicates that terrestrial vegetation emissions in the pre-industrial era were larger than in the present day. We use a chemical transport model and a radiative transfer model to show that revised inventories of pre-industrial fire and biogenic emissions lead to an increase in simulated pre-industrial ozone concentrations, decreasing the estimated pre-industrial to present-day tropospheric ozone radiative forcing by up to 34 % (0.38 to 0.25 W mspan classCombining double low line"inline-formula"-2/span). We find that this change is sensitive to employing biomass burning and biogenic emissions inventories based on matching vegetation patterns, as the co-location of emission sources enhances the effect on ozone formation. Our forcing estimates are at the lower end of existing uncertainty range estimates (0.2-0.6 W mspan classCombining double low line"inline-formula"-2/span), without accounting for other sources of uncertainty. Thus, future work should focus on reassessing the uncertainty range of tropospheric ozone radiative forcing.</p>},
  author       = {Rowlinson, Matthew J. and Rap, Alexandru and Hamilton, Douglas S. and Pope, Richard J. and Hantson, Stijn and Arnold, Steve R. and Kaplan, Jed O. and Arneth, Almut and Chipperfield, Martyn P. and Forster, Piers M. and Nieradzik, Lars M.},
  issn         = {1680-7316},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {18},
  pages        = {10937--10951},
  publisher    = {Copernicus Gesellschaft mbH},
  series       = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics},
  title        = {Tropospheric ozone radiative forcing uncertainty due to pre-industrial fire and biogenic emissions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10937-2020},
  doi          = {10.5194/acp-20-10937-2020},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2020},
}