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First and subsequent lifetime alcoholism and mental disorders in suicide victims with reference to a community sample-The Lundby Study 1947-1997

Holmstrand, Cecilia LU ; Bogren, Mats LU ; Mattisson, Cecilia LU and Brådvik, Louise LU (2018) In Frontiers in Psychiatry 9(MAY).
Abstract

Background: Suicide victims have been found to frequently suffer from mental disorders, often more than one, and comorbidity has also been found to be a risk factor for suicide. The aim of the present study was to determine the first disorder and possible subsequent disorders in suicide victims during their lifetimes and to compare their development with the development of mental and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in a community sample. Methods: The Lundby Study is a prospective longitudinal study of mental health in a general population comprising 3,563 subjects, including 68 suicide victims, followed by four field investigations from 1947 to 1997; mortality was monitored up to 2011. Results: AUD was most common as a first diagnosis... (More)

Background: Suicide victims have been found to frequently suffer from mental disorders, often more than one, and comorbidity has also been found to be a risk factor for suicide. The aim of the present study was to determine the first disorder and possible subsequent disorders in suicide victims during their lifetimes and to compare their development with the development of mental and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in a community sample. Methods: The Lundby Study is a prospective longitudinal study of mental health in a general population comprising 3,563 subjects, including 68 suicide victims, followed by four field investigations from 1947 to 1997; mortality was monitored up to 2011. Results: AUD was most common as a first diagnosis (26/68, 38.2%) among suicide victims, followed by "depression" (20/68, 29.4%) and "anxiety" (7/68, 10.3%). A predominance of AUD as a first diagnosis was found in the male group, whereas "depression" was the most common first diagnosis in the female group. However, there were very few females with AUD in the Lundby Study. In the whole population, it was more common for someone who started with an AUD to develop a subsequent mental disorder than the other way around. The same was true for AUD in relation to depression. Conclusions: AUD was the most common first mental disorder among male suicide victims and could thus be considered a starting point in the suicidal process. We propose that in addition to detecting and treating depression, it is important to detect and treat AUD vigorously and to be alert for subsequent symptoms of depressive and other mental disorders in suicide prevention efforts.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Alcoholism, Epidemiology, Long-term course, Mental disorders, Suicide
in
Frontiers in Psychiatry
volume
9
issue
MAY
article number
173
publisher
Frontiers Media S. A.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85046697934
  • pmid:29773997
ISSN
1664-0640
DOI
10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00173
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cda0487e-1f25-43f8-af04-7995fe3bff18
date added to LUP
2018-05-24 13:26:47
date last changed
2020-01-22 07:06:16
@article{cda0487e-1f25-43f8-af04-7995fe3bff18,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Suicide victims have been found to frequently suffer from mental disorders, often more than one, and comorbidity has also been found to be a risk factor for suicide. The aim of the present study was to determine the first disorder and possible subsequent disorders in suicide victims during their lifetimes and to compare their development with the development of mental and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in a community sample. Methods: The Lundby Study is a prospective longitudinal study of mental health in a general population comprising 3,563 subjects, including 68 suicide victims, followed by four field investigations from 1947 to 1997; mortality was monitored up to 2011. Results: AUD was most common as a first diagnosis (26/68, 38.2%) among suicide victims, followed by "depression" (20/68, 29.4%) and "anxiety" (7/68, 10.3%). A predominance of AUD as a first diagnosis was found in the male group, whereas "depression" was the most common first diagnosis in the female group. However, there were very few females with AUD in the Lundby Study. In the whole population, it was more common for someone who started with an AUD to develop a subsequent mental disorder than the other way around. The same was true for AUD in relation to depression. Conclusions: AUD was the most common first mental disorder among male suicide victims and could thus be considered a starting point in the suicidal process. We propose that in addition to detecting and treating depression, it is important to detect and treat AUD vigorously and to be alert for subsequent symptoms of depressive and other mental disorders in suicide prevention efforts.</p>},
  author       = {Holmstrand, Cecilia and Bogren, Mats and Mattisson, Cecilia and Brådvik, Louise},
  issn         = {1664-0640},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {MAY},
  publisher    = {Frontiers Media S. A.},
  series       = {Frontiers in Psychiatry},
  title        = {First and subsequent lifetime alcoholism and mental disorders in suicide victims with reference to a community sample-The Lundby Study 1947-1997},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00173},
  doi          = {10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00173},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2018},
}