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Mechanical effects of negative pressure wound therapy on abdominal wounds - effects of different pressures and wound fillers

Torbrand, Christian LU ; Anesäter, Erik; Borgquist, Ola LU and Malmsjö, Malin LU (2017) In International Wound Journal
Abstract

The mechanical deformation of the wound edge resulting from negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) at the standard setting of around -120mmHg has positive effects in promoting wound healing. However, it may cause pain to the patient during treatment. It is therefore important to study the mechanical effects of the wound edges using lower pressure and different wound fillers. Abdominal wounds were created on eight pigs. The wounds were sealed for NPWT using foam or gauze. Negative pressures between -20 and -160mmHg were applied, and the decrease in wound diameter and the force with which the edges of the wound were drawn together (wound edge force) were measured. Increasing levels of negative pressure resulted in a gradual decrease in... (More)

The mechanical deformation of the wound edge resulting from negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) at the standard setting of around -120mmHg has positive effects in promoting wound healing. However, it may cause pain to the patient during treatment. It is therefore important to study the mechanical effects of the wound edges using lower pressure and different wound fillers. Abdominal wounds were created on eight pigs. The wounds were sealed for NPWT using foam or gauze. Negative pressures between -20 and -160mmHg were applied, and the decrease in wound diameter and the force with which the edges of the wound were drawn together (wound edge force) were measured. Increasing levels of negative pressure resulted in a gradual decrease in wound diameter and increase in wound edge force and reached a maximum at -120mmHg, which is the pressure commonly used in clinical practice. Both the decrease in wound diameter and the increase in wound edge force was greater with foam than with gauze. A pressure of -80mmHg has only 15% less effect than -120mmHg, while a lower pressure (-40 mmHg) diminished the effects on diameter and force markedly. The NPWT-induced decrease in wound diameter and increase in wound edge force are greater at higher levels of negative pressure and when using foam than when using gauze as a wound filler. It may be possible to tailor the type of wound filler and level of negative pressure to obtain the best balance between wound healing and patient comfort.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Abdominal wounds, Experimental surgery, Pain, Vacuum-assisted closure, Wound healing
in
International Wound Journal
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85034977988
ISSN
1742-4801
DOI
10.1111/iwj.12810
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cdc7c5d4-a025-41b7-892c-488ec927d347
date added to LUP
2017-12-27 14:06:22
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:29:45
@article{cdc7c5d4-a025-41b7-892c-488ec927d347,
  abstract     = {<p>The mechanical deformation of the wound edge resulting from negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) at the standard setting of around -120mmHg has positive effects in promoting wound healing. However, it may cause pain to the patient during treatment. It is therefore important to study the mechanical effects of the wound edges using lower pressure and different wound fillers. Abdominal wounds were created on eight pigs. The wounds were sealed for NPWT using foam or gauze. Negative pressures between -20 and -160mmHg were applied, and the decrease in wound diameter and the force with which the edges of the wound were drawn together (wound edge force) were measured. Increasing levels of negative pressure resulted in a gradual decrease in wound diameter and increase in wound edge force and reached a maximum at -120mmHg, which is the pressure commonly used in clinical practice. Both the decrease in wound diameter and the increase in wound edge force was greater with foam than with gauze. A pressure of -80mmHg has only 15% less effect than -120mmHg, while a lower pressure (-40 mmHg) diminished the effects on diameter and force markedly. The NPWT-induced decrease in wound diameter and increase in wound edge force are greater at higher levels of negative pressure and when using foam than when using gauze as a wound filler. It may be possible to tailor the type of wound filler and level of negative pressure to obtain the best balance between wound healing and patient comfort.</p>},
  author       = {Torbrand, Christian and Anesäter, Erik and Borgquist, Ola and Malmsjö, Malin},
  issn         = {1742-4801},
  keyword      = {Abdominal wounds,Experimental surgery,Pain,Vacuum-assisted closure,Wound healing},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {International Wound Journal},
  title        = {Mechanical effects of negative pressure wound therapy on abdominal wounds - effects of different pressures and wound fillers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/iwj.12810},
  year         = {2017},
}