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Viscosity reduction of pretreated softwood by endoglucanases

Kadić, Adnan LU and Lidén, Gunnar LU (2018) In Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology 93(8). p.2440-2446
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cost-effective processing of lignocellulosic biomass into sugar derived products, such as biofuels or biochemicals, needs to be performed at high water insoluble solid (WIS) loading. However, the difficult rheology of such materials presents significant challenges. The aim of this study was to investigate if a Cel5A endoglucanase can be used to reduce the viscosity of two types of pretreated softwood: steam pretreated Scots pine and sulfite pretreated Norway spruce. RESULTS: The viscosity of steam pretreated pine increased (by more than 60%) during the first 20min of enzymatic hydrolysis, followed by a gradual decrease. A slightly lower viscosity during prolonged hydrolysis could be obtained by replacing 25% of the protein... (More)

BACKGROUND: Cost-effective processing of lignocellulosic biomass into sugar derived products, such as biofuels or biochemicals, needs to be performed at high water insoluble solid (WIS) loading. However, the difficult rheology of such materials presents significant challenges. The aim of this study was to investigate if a Cel5A endoglucanase can be used to reduce the viscosity of two types of pretreated softwood: steam pretreated Scots pine and sulfite pretreated Norway spruce. RESULTS: The viscosity of steam pretreated pine increased (by more than 60%) during the first 20min of enzymatic hydrolysis, followed by a gradual decrease. A slightly lower viscosity during prolonged hydrolysis could be obtained by replacing 25% of the protein in Cellic CTec3 with the Cel5A endoglucanase. Very different results were obtained with sulfite pretreated spruce. The viscosity of this material was rapidly reduced by either CTec3 or the Cel5A endoglucanase, without a transient initial increase in viscosity. Even very low doses of Cel5A (0.1mg protein per g glucan) decreased the viscosity of sulfite pretreated spruce 30-fold within 6h. CONCLUSION: Low endoglucanase doses can be used to reduce the viscosity of sulfite pretreated softwood, whereas the viscosity of steam pretreated softwood is less affected by endoglucanase activity.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Biofuel, Enzymes, Mixing, Rheology, Wood
in
Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology
volume
93
issue
8
pages
2440 - 2446
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85044202066
ISSN
0268-2575
DOI
10.1002/jctb.5600
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ce72e7c1-98bf-4392-af09-b9803ccea87e
date added to LUP
2018-04-09 14:12:32
date last changed
2019-01-14 14:55:14
@article{ce72e7c1-98bf-4392-af09-b9803ccea87e,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Cost-effective processing of lignocellulosic biomass into sugar derived products, such as biofuels or biochemicals, needs to be performed at high water insoluble solid (WIS) loading. However, the difficult rheology of such materials presents significant challenges. The aim of this study was to investigate if a Cel5A endoglucanase can be used to reduce the viscosity of two types of pretreated softwood: steam pretreated Scots pine and sulfite pretreated Norway spruce. RESULTS: The viscosity of steam pretreated pine increased (by more than 60%) during the first 20min of enzymatic hydrolysis, followed by a gradual decrease. A slightly lower viscosity during prolonged hydrolysis could be obtained by replacing 25% of the protein in Cellic CTec3 with the Cel5A endoglucanase. Very different results were obtained with sulfite pretreated spruce. The viscosity of this material was rapidly reduced by either CTec3 or the Cel5A endoglucanase, without a transient initial increase in viscosity. Even very low doses of Cel5A (0.1mg protein per g glucan) decreased the viscosity of sulfite pretreated spruce 30-fold within 6h. CONCLUSION: Low endoglucanase doses can be used to reduce the viscosity of sulfite pretreated softwood, whereas the viscosity of steam pretreated softwood is less affected by endoglucanase activity.</p>},
  author       = {Kadić, Adnan and Lidén, Gunnar},
  issn         = {0268-2575},
  keyword      = {Biofuel,Enzymes,Mixing,Rheology,Wood},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {2440--2446},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology},
  title        = {Viscosity reduction of pretreated softwood by endoglucanases},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jctb.5600},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {2018},
}